System Bits: July 16


Test tube AI neural network In a significant step towards demonstrating the capacity to program artificial intelligence into synthetic biomolecular circuits, Caltech researchers have developed an artificial neural network made out of DNA that can solve a classic machine learning problem: correctly identifying handwritten numbers. The work was done in the laboratory of Lulu Qian, assistant p... » read more

System Bits: July 10


Foldable electronic switches and sensors Using inexpensive materials, UC Berkeley engineers have created a method to fabricate foldable electronic switches and sensors directly onto paper, along with prototype generators, supercapacitors and other electronic devices for what they said is a range of applications. Besides the fact that it is readily available and low cost, the team pointed ou... » read more

System Bits: July 3


Machine learning network for personalized autism therapy MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a personalized deep learning network for therapy use with children with autism spectrum conditions. They reminded these children often have trouble recognizing the emotional states of people around them, such as distinguishing a happy face from a fearful face. To help with this, some therapists... » read more

System Bits: June 26


I’m enjoying a very busy Design Automation Conference this week in San Francisco, and on the lookout for interesting research topics here. In the meantime, enjoy a few interesting items from around the globe. AI platform diagnoses Zika and other pathogens University of Campinas (UNICAMP) researchers in Brazil have developed an AI platform that can diagnose several diseases with a high deg... » read more

System Bits: June 19


ML algorithm 3D scan comparison up to 1,000 times faster To address the issue of medical image registration that typically takes two hours or more to meticulously align each of potentially a million pixels in the combined scans, MIT researchers have created a machine-learning algorithm they say can register brain scans and other 3D images more than 1,000 times more quickly using novel learning... » read more

System Bits: June 12


Writing complex ML/DL analytics algorithms Rice University researchers in the DARPA-funded Pliny Project believe they have the answer for every stressed-out systems programmer who has struggled to implement complex objects and workflows on ‘big data’ platforms like Spark and thought: “Isn’t there a better way?” Their answer: Yes with PlinyCompute, which the team describes as “a sys... » read more

System Bits: June 5


The right squeeze for quantum computing In an effort to bring quantum computers closer to development, Hokkaido University and Kyoto University researchers have developed a theoretical approach to quantum computing that is 10 billion times more tolerant to errors than current theoretical models. The team said their method may lead to quantum computers that use the diverse properties of sub... » read more

System Bits: May 29


Ultra-low-power sensors carrying genetically engineered bacteria to detect gastric bleeding In order to diagnose bleeding in the stomach or other gastrointestinal problems, MIT researchers have built an ingestible sensor equipped with genetically engineered bacteria. [caption id="attachment_24134598" align="alignleft" width="300"] MIT engineers have designed an ingestible sensor equipped with... » read more

System Bits: May 22


AI disruptions and benefits in the workplace According to Stanford University researchers, artificial intelligence offers both promise and peril as it revolutionizes the workplace, the economy and personal lives. Visiting scholar James Timbie of the Hoover Institution, who studies artificial intelligence and other technologies, said that in the workplace of tomorrow, many routine jobs now p... » read more

System Bits: May 15


Navigating with GPS and sensors According to MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) researchers, navigating roads less traveled in self-driving cars is a difficult task mainly because self-driving cars are usually only tested in major cities where countless hours have been spent meticulously labeling the exact 3D positions of lanes, curbs, off-ramps, and stop signs... » read more

← Older posts