System Bits: Jan. 16


Nitrogen-atom-sized sensors A new quantum sensor developed by Fraunhofer researchers will be able to measure the tiny magnetic fields of the next generation of hard discs, leveraging the new opportunities that quantum technology promises. [caption id="attachment_430671" align="aligncenter" width="300"] The special ellipsoid form of the plasma reactor developed at Fraunhofer IAF allows for l... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 9


Microspectrometer smartens up smartphones Thanks to researchers at TU Eindhoven, smartphones are about to get much smarter to do things like checking how clean the air is, whether food is fresh or a lump is malignant thanks to a spectrometer that is so small it can be incorporated easily and cheaply in a mobile phone. The little sensor developed at TU Eindhoven is just as precise as the no... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 2


Robots imagine their future to learn By playing with objects and then imagining how to get the task done, UC Berkeley researchers have developed a robotic learning technology that enables robots to figure out how to manipulate objects they have never encountered before. The team expects this technology could help self-driving cars anticipate future events on the road and produce more intel... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 19


Controlling qubits for quantum computing In a major step toward making a quantum computer using everyday materials, a team led by researchers at Princeton University has reported they’ve constructed a key piece of silicon hardware capable of controlling quantum behavior between two electrons with extremely high precision. The team said they have constructed a gate that controls interactio... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 12


Increasing performance scaling with packageless processors Demand for increasing performance is far outpacing the capability of traditional methods for performance scaling. Disruptive solutions are needed to advance beyond incremental improvements. Traditionally, processors reside inside packages to enable PCB-based integration. However, a team of researchers from the Department of Electrical ... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 5


[caption id="attachment_429586" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Vivienne Sze, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT. Source: MIT[/caption] Building deep learning hardware A new course at MIT is bringing together both electrical engineering and computer science to educate student in the highly sought after field of deep learning. Vivienne Sze, an assoc... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 28


Better absorbing materials
 University of Illinois bioengineers have taken a new look at an old tool to help characterize a class of materials called metal organic frameworks (MOFs), used to detect, purify and store gases. The team believes these could help solve some of the world's most challenging energy, environmental and pharmaceutical challenges – and even pull water molecules straigh... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 21


MIT-Lamborghini to develop electric car Members of the MIT community were recently treated to a glimpse of the future as they passed through the Stata Center courtyard as the Lamborghini Terzo Millenio (Third Millennium) was in view, which is an automobile prototype for the third millennium. [caption id="attachment_429209" align="alignnone" width="300"] Lamborghini is relying on MIT to make i... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 14


Tracking cyber attacks According to Georgia Tech, assessing the extent and impact of network or computer system attacks has been largely a time-consuming manual process, until now since a new software system being developed by cybersecurity researchers here will largely automate that process, allowing investigators to quickly and accurately pinpoint how intruders entered the network, what data... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 7


Exposing logic errors in deep neural networks In a new approach meant to brings transparency to self-driving cars and other self-taught systems, researchers at Columbia and Lehigh universities have come up with a way to automatically error-check the thousands to millions of neurons in a deep learning neural network. Their tool — DeepXplore — feeds confusing, real-world inputs into the ... » read more

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