Manufacturing Bits: March 20

Giant thermometer The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has devised a new way to take the temperature of a material at the nanoscale—the organization has developed a giant thermometer. The technology, dubbed electron energy gain spectroscopy, enables researchers to take the temperature of a material from an area at about a billionth of a meter wide. Developed by Nion, t... » read more

System Bits: March 20

Design has consequences Carnegie Mellon University design students are exploring ways to enhance interactions with new technologies and the power of artificial intelligence. Assistant Professor Dan Lockton teaches the course, "Environments Studio IV: Designing Environments for Social Systems" in CMU's School of Design and leads the school's new Imaginaries Lab. “We want the designers of ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Mar. 20

Proton battery prototype A team at RMIT University built a prototype rechargeable proton battery combining hydrogen fuel cells and battery-based electrical power that has the potential, with further development, to store more energy than currently-available lithium ion batteries. The working prototype proton battery uses an activated carbon electrode for solid-state storage of hydrogen with... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 13

Gallium oxide substrates Kyma Technologies has rolled out a substrate line based on crystalline beta-phase gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3) materials. [caption id="attachment_24132458" align="alignleft" width="300"] Single crystal gallium oxide (ß-Ga2O3) substrates (Source: Kyma)[/caption] Crystalline beta gallium oxide is a promising wide bandgap semiconductor material. It has a large bandgap... » read more

System Bits: March 13

Wiring quantum computers According to MIT researchers, when we talk about “information technology,” we generally mean the technology part, like computers, networks, and software. But they reminded that the information itself, and its behavior in quantum systems, is a central focus for MIT’s interdisciplinary Quantum Engineering Group (QEG) as it seeks to develop quantum computing and oth... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Mar. 13

Wireless charging Engineers at the University of Washington developed a method to safely charge a smartphone wirelessly using a laser, potentially as quickly as a standard USB cable. Safety features of the system include a reflector-based mechanism to shut off the laser and heatsinks. The charging beam is generated by a laser emitter that the team configured to produce a focused beam in the... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 6

Security ICs with multi-beam Leti, a research institute of CEA Tech, and Mapper Lithography have developed a new application for its multi-beam, direct-write lithography technology—security. In 2016, Mapper Lithography introduced the FLX-1200, a direct-write, multi-beam e-beam system. Using a 5-kV acceleration voltage, a beam generator creates an electron beam about 3cm in diameter. Then,... » read more

System Bits: March 6

Printed graphene biosensors According to researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT in St. Ingbert (in Germany’s Saarland region), cell-based biosensors can simulate the effect of various substances, such as drugs, on the human body in the laboratory but depending on the measuring principle, producing them can be expensive. As such, they aren’t used very often.... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Mar. 6

Neural network chip Neural networks are both slow and consume a lot of power. This made researchers at MIT examine the important aspects of the nodes within a neural network and to see how each part of the computation could be improved. The outcome was a dedicated chip that increases the speed of neural-network computations by three to seven times over its predecessors, while reducing power c... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 27

Magnesium-ion batteries Texas A&M University and others have discovered a new metal-oxide magnesium battery cathode material—a technology that promises to deliver a higher density of energy storage than today’s traditional lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells. Magnesium-ion battery technology is promising. A battery consists of an anode (negative), cathode (positive), electrolytes and a separat... » read more

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