Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 17


GOOI FETs The next-generation power semiconductor market is heating up. Two wide-bandgap technologies—gallium nitride (GaN) on silicon devices and silicon carbide (SiC) MOSFETs—are ramping up in the power semi market. In addition, the industry is also exploring various futuristic technologies, such as bulk vertical GaN, diamond FETs and others. Purdue University has demonstrated another... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 17


Turning quantum systems from novelties into useful technologies In what is believed to be a major achievement that could help bring the strange and powerful world of quantum technology closer to reality, University of Sydney researchers have demonstrated the ability to “see” the future of quantum systems, and used that knowledge to preempt their demise. The applications of quantum-enabl... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 17


Creating magnets with electricity Researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea Institute of Materials Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Max Planck Institute, and the University of New South Wales drew magnetic squares in a nonmagnetic material with an electrified pen and then "read" this magneti... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 10


Atom interferometers The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has devised one of the world’s most accurate atom interferometers. Interferometry is a common measurement technique. Basically, the technology looks at electromagnetic waves. The waves are superimposed to extract information. One interferometry technology type, called an atom interferometer, utilizes the waves of ato... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 10


Speeding up computing tasks by turning memory chips into processors In a development that could lead to data being processed in the same spot where it is stored, for much faster and thinner mobile devices and computers, a team of researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), Germany’s RWTH Aachen University, and interdisciplinary research center Forschungszent... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 10


Antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric RAM Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Swiss Nanoscience Institute, and the University of Basel developed a concept for a new, low power memory chip. In particular, the group focused on finding an alternative to MRAM using magnetoelectric antiferromagnets, which are activated by an electrical voltage rather than by a current. "... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 3


3D printed military drones The U.S. Army Research Laboratory has begun testing 3D printed drones for use in on-demand military missions. The technology, called the On-Demand Small Unmanned Aircraft System (ODSUAS), enables a soldier to input the mission requirements in software. Then, a 3D printer devises the optimal configuration for an unmanned aerial vehicle. And it’s printed and deliv... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 3


Clues to high-temp superconductivity Offering clues about the microscopic origins of high-temperature superconductivity, physicists at Rice University’s Center for Quantum Materials (RCQM) have created a new iron-based material. The material is a formulation of iron, sodium, copper and arsenic created by Rice graduate student Yu Song in the laboratory of physicist Pengcheng Dai. The recip... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 3


Paper-based bacteria battery Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have created a bacteria-powered battery on a single sheet of paper that can power disposable electronics. The manufacturing technique reduces fabrication time and cost, and the design could revolutionize the use of bio-batteries as a power source in remote, dangerous and resource-limited areas. ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Dec. 27


Coffee ring effect In physics, the “coffee ring effect" has been the subject of study for years. This phenomenon is a simple concept. A liquid or droplet hits a surface and dries. The particles in the droplet are suspended. And ultimately, it leaves a ring-like pattern. The phenomenon is named for the formation of a ring-like deposit when coffee or other liquid resides on a surface. ... » read more

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