System Bits: May 22


AI disruptions and benefits in the workplace According to Stanford University researchers, artificial intelligence offers both promise and peril as it revolutionizes the workplace, the economy and personal lives. Visiting scholar James Timbie of the Hoover Institution, who studies artificial intelligence and other technologies, said that in the workplace of tomorrow, many routine jobs now p... » read more

System Bits: May 15


Navigating with GPS and sensors According to MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) researchers, navigating roads less traveled in self-driving cars is a difficult task mainly because self-driving cars are usually only tested in major cities where countless hours have been spent meticulously labeling the exact 3D positions of lanes, curbs, off-ramps, and stop signs... » read more

System Bits: May 8


Unlocking the brain Stanford University researchers recently reminded that for years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and now AI is starting to return the favor: while not explicitly designed to do so, certain AI systems seem to mimic our brains’ inner workings more closely than previously thought. [caption id="attach... » read more

System Bits: May 1


Tiniest implanted wireless nerve stimulator UC Berkeley researchers, co-led by Rikky Muller, who is also assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences at Berkeley, have built what they say is the smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulator to date. Before this milestone, UC Berkeley engineers demonstrated the first implanted, ultrasonic neural dust sensor... » read more

System Bits: April 24


Some superconductors carry spin currents A few years ago, researchers from the University of Cambridge showed that it was possible to create electron pairs in which the spins are aligned: up-up or down-down. The spin current can be carried by up-up and down-down pairs moving in opposite directions with a net charge current of zero, and the ability to create such a pure spin super-current is an... » read more

System Bits: April 17


Smartphone microscopes transformed into lab-grade devices with deep learning UCLA Samueli School of Engineering researchers have demonstrated that deep learning techniques can discern and enhance microscopic details in photos taken by smartphones in order to improve the resolution and color details of smartphone images so much that they approach the quality of images from laboratory-grade mic... » read more

System Bits: April 10


Ultrafast laser beam steering for autonomous cars Researchers at Purdue University and Stanford University reported they have found a novel laser light sensing technology that is more robust and less expensive than currently available with a wide range of uses, including a way to guide fully autonomous vehicles. The team said this innovation is orders of magnitude faster than conventional l... » read more

System Bits: April 3


Investigating the human brain for quantum computation potential While much has been made of quantum computing processes using ultracold atoms and ions, superconducting junctions and defects in diamonds, researchers are questioning if this could be performed in human brains. In fact, UC Santa Barbara theoretical physicist Matthew Fisher has been asking this question for years. And now as scient... » read more

System Bits: March 27


New quantum electronic material has atomic structure resembling a Japanese basketweaving pattern According to MIT, Harvard University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers, a motif of Japanese basketweaving known as the kagome pattern has preoccupied physicists for decades. They reminded that kagome baskets are typically made from strips of bamboo woven into a highly symmetric... » read more

System Bits: March 20


Design has consequences Carnegie Mellon University design students are exploring ways to enhance interactions with new technologies and the power of artificial intelligence. Assistant Professor Dan Lockton teaches the course, "Environments Studio IV: Designing Environments for Social Systems" in CMU's School of Design and leads the school's new Imaginaries Lab. “We want the designers of ... » read more

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