The Week In Review: IoT


Analysis Whither Intel’s Internet of Things efforts? “While Intel's IoT business certainly won't solve its ongoing troubles in the PC and data center markets anytime soon, staying invested in that market will ensure that the chipmaker doesn't miss another major technological shift, as it did with mobile devices about a decade ago,” Leo Sun writes in this analysis. Products Cisco Sys... » read more

The Week In Review: IoT


Conferences It’s been an action-packed week at Internet of Things World. The show was co-located at the Santa Clara Convention Center with the Connected & Autonomous Vehicles conference. There were lots of deals announced and many products or services debuted at IoT World, which has grown enormously in four years, from 700 attendees at its first event in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2014 to some 14... » read more

The Week In Review: IoT


Conferences The Internet of Things World conference is on tap next week at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Silicon Valley. There will be more than 250 exhibitors on the show floor, with 11,000 attendees expected. More than 400 speakers will make presentations over three days, May 16-17-18. ON Semiconductor will have a number of IoT-related products to demonstrate at its booth, including i... » read more

Embedded FPGA, The Ultimate Accelerator


An embedded FPGA (eFPGA) is an IP core that you integrate into your ASIC or SoC to get the benefits of programmable logic without the cost, but with better latency, throughput, and power characteristics. With an eFPGA, you define the quantity of look-up-tables (LUTs), registers, embedded memory, and DSP blocks. You can also control the aspect ratio, number of I/O ports, making tradeoffs between... » read more

The Week In Review: IoT


Q&A Francine Berman, a computer science professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, talks about ethical issues in the Internet of Things in this interview. She says, “First of all, we’re just at the tip of the iceberg in what is arguably going to be a brave new world. And it’s highly heterogeneous: We’ll be seeing a lot more autonomous systems, we’ll be seeing enhanced humans and ... » read more

What Autonomy Level Is Your Car?


Over the past couple of months, you've probably heard semiconductor industry executives dropping numbers about the levels of autonomy for vehicles. And despite Tesla's highly touted autonomous capabilities, current models are just a Level 2. Or maybe it's a Level 3. If these numbered levels were meant to lessen the confusion, it's not clear the plan is working. Until last September, there we... » read more

Resolving Privacy In The Car


As we increasing connect our vehicles — and therefore ourselves — with the outside world while driving, concerns about privacy are coming up, and for good reason. As I was researching software in the vehicle for this article, Larry Lapides from Imperas Software brought up a good point about how security and privacy in the vehicle will likely be split into two separately addressed issues.... » read more

Drone Heads Into Thin Air


The drone copter was being held prisoner. While ARM engineer Matt Du Puy and his fellow climbers were rotating between camps on Kanchenjunga preparing to ascend the world’s third-highest peak, a key new addition to his ARM-powered electronics kit was being held back by Nepalese customs officials. The drone copter was shipped to Kathmandu several weeks ago for Matt and team to pick up be... » read more

IIoT Grows, But So Do Risks


By Jeff Dorsch & Ed Sperling After years of fitful progress, [getkc id="78" kc_name="Industrial Internet of Things"] technology is gaining adoption on the factory floor, in the electrical power grid, and other areas that could do with greater amounts of data analysis and insights from a connected ecosystem. AT&T, General Electric, IBM, Verizon Communications, and other large ... » read more

Putting A Hardware Root-of-Trust To Work In An Anti-Counterfeiting IC


An anti-counterfeiting security IC is conceptually rather simple: during manufacture, it is securely programmed with some secret data. Then during operation, it can prove to a verifying host that it knows that secret data. This “proof of knowledge” is often all that can be expected of a low-cost security IC. This prove-you-know-the-secret authentication process between the security IC an... » read more

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