MapD Makes GPUs First-Class Citizens

It’s now well known that with the latest innovations in parallel programming and GPU technology, graphics processing units (GPUs) can be harnessed today to deal with the enormous data sets regularly encountered in applications ranging from ADAS, artificial intelligence, and gaming to deep learning, scientific computation, and high-performance computing. But how exactly do you find what you... » read more

Getting The Jump On Analog/RF IP

When Magma Design was sold to Synopsys in 2012, then-president and COO Roy Jewell sat down with VC Lucio Lanza to figure out what to do next. As Jewell tells it, Lanza convinced him not to take another job. While it’s too early to tell if that was sage advice, it did trigger a search for a new business and a way of funding it. Jewell said that when Magma went looking for money, it raised $... » read more

Menta Embeds FPGA Programmability

What constitutes a startup can be a matter of the market segment you are going after and the type of product that you are building. Within [getkc id="7" kc_name="EDA"], we often think of the lifetime of a company being just a few years between when an opportunity is identified, to a product being built and getting the first few customers and then getting gobbled up by one of the big three. But ... » read more

Valtrix Pushes For Horizontal Verification Reuse

Some of the most significant advances are not the result of a single person or a single idea. They often don’t happen overnight, and are suggested by a change that slowly becomes pervasive enough to become a generalized solution. That is exactly what is happening right now in the area of functional verification. The tools and methodologies in place at the moment assumed designs typical of the... » read more

Silexica: Multicore Software Automation

Multicore programming has a long and troubled history, and it has become much worse as the computing world moves increasingly toward heterogeneous multicore architectures. While it's easy enough to map out the hardware's power/performance characteristics, it is much harder to make the software take advantage of the appropriate cores. Enter Silexa, which began as a research project in 2008 at... » read more

GridComm: Smarter Grids

Streetlights were considered a big improvement over gas lamps when they were first introduced in the late 19th century. And since then, not much has changed, other than the addition of more streetlights as cities and towns grew and different kinds of bulbs. But streetlights do account for about 40% of a city's electricity budget, which can amount to tens of millions of dollars a month for la... » read more

Intento Design

While the United States is where most EDA developments have come from, there have been pockets of success at various places around the world and one that has produced more than most in recent years in France. Semiconductor Engineering spoke with [getperson id=" 11759 " comment ="Ramy Iskander"], founder and CEO and Eric Laurent, worldwide sales and business development for [getentity id="22905"... » read more

UltraSoC: Debug IP

The background noise across the engineering community is rising with the growing complexity of SoCs. While the big news several years ago was the introduction of chips with 1 billion transistors, that's no longer making headlines. There are now well over 1 billion transistors in advanced SoCs and more than 100 IP blocks. Even abstractions are beginning to break down (see related story). Ent... » read more

zeroK NanoTech: FIB Circuit Edit

Focused ion beam (FIB) circuit editing is an enabling technology that has been around for some time. Using a standard FIB tool, a chipmaker can basically edit portions of a circuit before it goes into production. It allows chipmakers to debug chips, cut traces, add metal connections and perform other functions. One startup, zeroK NanoTech, is putting a new and innovative twist on FIB circui... » read more

Nymi: Wearable Authentication

If you had one device that could log into all your electronics automatically, allowing you to make electronic payments more securely based on your heart beat rhythms, would you use it? That's the question a startup named Nymi is asking—and a lot of other companies are watching. The company began its life in 2011 using a biometric electrocardiogram developed at the University of Toronto. ... » read more

← Older posts