The Path To (Virtually) Zero Defective Parts Per Million


Despite thorough wafer and package testing, a small number of defective ICs can make their way into systems. These test "escapes" often return as field failures, increasing costs and eroding profit margins. They can also present a hazard if deployed in safety-critical systems, which is why companies purchasing semiconductors for automotive, medical, or aerospace applications often demand a zero... » read more

The Return Of Time Sharing


As early as the 1960s, it wasn't uncommon to hear that transistors would be free. Those were pretty bold statements at the time, considering most computers in those days cost $1 million, required special rooms, and budding computer scientists usually had to sign up to use mainframe computers for one-hour time slots—often in the middle of the night or on weekends. Still, those predictions ... » read more

Better Chips, Better Cars


There are literally thousands of electronic components in a new car, and those numbers are only going to increase as cars become smarter, safer, greener, and increasingly connected. As automakers and Tier 1 and Tier 2 companies shift their focus from mechanical to a combination of mechanical and electrical, there is an ongoing race among fabless companies to come up with innovative technolog... » read more

Test More Complex For Cars, IoT


With increasing focus on safety-critical semiconductors—driven by ADAS, IoT, and security—functional safety concerns are going through the roof. Engineering teams are scrambling to determine how to conduct better in-field or online testing because test no longer can be an afterthought. This has been a common theme across the automotive ecosystem for the past few years, and as the automot... » read more

Devices Threatened By Analog Content?


As the amount of analog content in connected devices explodes, ensuring that the analog portion works properly has taken on a new level of urgency. Analog circuitry is required for interpreting the physical world and for moving data to other parts of the system, while digital circuitry is the fastest way to process it. So a sensor that gives a faulty reading in a car moving at high speed or ... » read more

Connected Car Driving Change In Defect Detection


Automotive product design is rapidly evolving and the magnitude and pace of change facing engineering organizations is challenging incumbent processes and resources, especially in the area of software design. While connected cars are not new, the frequency and depth to which the industry is embracing this dynamic is accelerating. Software has emerged as a primary vehicle for innovation and diff... » read more

ATO 2017: Driven by Necessity


In the aerospace and defense industry, reducing release cycles and preventing program delays have become increasingly difficult. In automotive, consumer demands are driving up test complexity and introducing new costs in areas like infotainment. In response, test managers must find affordable ways to incorporate RF testing for wireless signals and machine vision testing for assisted parking to ... » read more

Simplifying The Road To ISO 26262 Compliance


By Joseph Dailey and Robert Bates Since the release of ISO 26262 in November 2011, companies have had to figure out how to navigate the standard’s requirements throughout the development process of electrical and/or electronic systems for road vehicles. Recently new trends have emerged — software companies have started pre-qualifying both their software tools for use by their customers, ... » read more

Formal Verification Takes Safety-Critical Applications For A Drive


The high reliability of safety-critical chips for automotive applications is a well-known imperative for today’s higher-end cars and as driverless cars move closer to reality. Uber, in fact, is testing autonomous cars in Boston of all places, where aggressive driving reigns supreme and honking the horn is considered an art form. As automotive manufacturers realize that their differentiatio... » read more

What Can Go Wrong In Automotive


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss automotive engineering with Jinesh Jain, supervisor for advanced architectures in Ford’s Research and Innovation Center in Palo Alto; Raed Shatara, market development for automotive infotainment at [getentity id="22331" comment="STMicroelectronics"]; Joe Hupcey, verification product technologist at [getentity id="22017" e_name="Mentor Graphics"]; ... » read more

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