Manufacturing Bits: June 13


FeFET biz heats up The ferroelectric FET (FeFET) market is heating up. One company, Ferroelectric Memory Co. (FMC), has been developing FeFETs, a new memory type for use in standalone and embedded applications. Now, Imec is also developing FeFETs in both planar and vertical varieties. [caption id="attachment_147967" align="alignleft" width="239"] Imec's FeFET (Source: Imec)[/caption] ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 24


Reducing MRAM chip area Researchers from Tohoku University developed a technology to stack magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) directly on the via without causing deterioration to its electric/magnetic characteristics. The team focused on reducing the memory cell area of spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) in order to lower manufacturing costs, making them more compe... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 26


Multi-beam inspection For some time, Singaporean startup Maglen has been developing a multi-beam e-beam inspection tool technology. Now, Maglen has reached two milestones. First, it has devised a full column test stand. The test stand includes a mechanical column and software. The second milestone is also significant. “We also dropped our beam and obtained our very first images,” sai... » read more

System Bits: April 5


Encoding electrons with valleytronics Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a new type of electronics that could lead to faster and more efficient computer logic systems and data storage chips in next-generation devices that they refer to as “valleytronics.” Specifically, the team has experimentally demonstra... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 1


Gravitational-wave observatories India has approved the construction of the world’s third gravitational-wave observatory. This facility will replicate the two Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatories (LIGOs) in the United States, which recently detected the world's first gravitational waves. The Indian project, dubbed LIGO-India, is expected to go online in 2023. The effort b... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 17


Speeding up optical networks A tunable filter for high-capacity optical networks that can be integrated onto a photonic chip has been designed by researchers at the Université Laval in Québec, Canada. The device's performance is comparable to the best bench-top systems, according to the reasearchers, but at a fraction of the size and cost. The filter's tuning span, which is a measure of... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 22


Scaling up production of thin electronic materials With potential application in future spintronics applications, among other things, a team led by MIT researchers have developed a way to make large sheets of molybdenum telluride (MoTe2) and other materials like graphene that hold promise for electronic, optical, and other high-tech applications. The team — which includes MIT postdoc Lin ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 21


Graphene metrology Harvard University, Monash University and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new technique that provides atomic-scale images of colloidal nanoparticles. The technique, dubbed SINGLE, stands for 3D Structure Identification of Nanoparticles by Graphene Liquid Cell Electron Microscopy. Using the technology, researchers ha... » read more

System Bits: May 26


Microfluidic cell-squeezing MIT researchers have shown it is possible to use a microfluidic cell-squeezing device to introduce specific antigens inside the immune system’s B cells, providing a new approach to developing and implementing antigen-presenting cell vaccines. These types of vaccines are created by reprogramming a patient’s own immune cells to fight invaders, and are believed ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 24


Simulating ultrafast phenomena Interesting phenomena can happen when electronic states in materials are excited during dynamic processes. As an example, electrical charge transfer can take place on quadrillionth-of-a-second, or femtosecond, timescales. Numerical simulations in real-time provide the best way to study these processes. Such simulations, however, can be extremely expensive. R... » read more

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