Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 3

World’s fastest phototransistor The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed what the university claims is the world’s fastest and most responsive flexible silicon phototransistor. Phototransistors are semiconductor light sensors. They are based on a transistor with a transparent cover. They provide better sensitivity than a photodiode. The futuristic phototransistor from the Un... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: August 11

World neutrino record The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has achieved a world record for high-energy neutrino experiments. In one neutrino experiment, researchers sustained a 521-kilowatt beam generated by the organization’s so-called Main Injector particle accelerator. The previous record was a 400-plus-kilowatt beam, which was accomplished at CERN. ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 3

Nanoimprint consortium CEA-Leti has launched a nanoimprint lithography program in an effort to propel the technology in the marketplace. The imprint program, dubbed Inspire, will focus on various and emerging non-semiconductor applications, according to Laurent Pain, patterning program manager and business development manager within the Silicon Technologies division at the French R&D or... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 2

Looking at space dust The first analysis of space dust, collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006, is more complex in composition and structure than previously thought. Researchers examined the dust using synchrotron light sources from three groups--the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley... » read more

System Bits: July 22

All graphene is not the same Widely touted as the most electrically conductive material ever studied, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania now understand that all graphene is not the same. With so few atoms comprising the entirety of the material, the arrangement of each one has an impact on its overall function. The team has used an advanced microscope to study the relationship be... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 22

Skateboarding on 2D materials Two-dimensional materials are gaining steam in the R&D labs. The 2D materials include graphene, boron nitride (BN) and the transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). These materials are attractive candidates for futuristic field-effect transistors (FETs). But researchers must gain more insight into these materials in order to understand their properties. For ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 29

Silky e-beam lithography Tufts University has put a soft and silky spin on direct-write electron-beam lithography. Researchers used common silk as the resist material, enabling the production of photonic lattices, quantum dots and other structures. This approach is a green alternative to traditional and toxic resists. The silk-based resist is developed using a water-based process. It starts... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 22

Detecting counterfeit goods Rare earths are chemical elements found in the Earth’s crust. They are critical for use in the production of cars, consumer electronics, computers, communications, clean energy, health care, national defense systems and others. Researchers are looking for new ways to integrate rare earths into potential chips and other applications. For example, the Massachuset... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 14

Disorderly conduct With a significant ability to store power per a given weight, lithium batteries have been a major focus of research to enable use in everything from portable electronics to electric cars and now researchers at MIT and Brookhaven National Laboratory have found the use of disordered materials – generally considered unsuitable for batteries – can be used in a new avenue for... » read more