System Bits: Oct. 17


Piezoelectric, ingestible sensors With an aim to help doctors diagnose gastrointestinal disorders that slow down the passage of food through the digestive tract, MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers have built a flexible sensor that can be rolled up and swallowed. Once ingested, the sensor adheres to the stomach wall or intestinal lining, where it can measure the rhythmic con... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 19


Novel quantum computing architecture invented University of New South Wales researchers have invented what they say is a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on ‘flip-flop qubits,’ that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically easier. [caption id="attachment_319384" align="alignnone" width="300"] Artist's impression of flip-flop qubit e... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: April 18


Cooling hotspots Engineers at Duke University and Intel developed a technology to cool hotspots in high-performance electronics. The new technology relies on a vapor chamber made of a super-hydrophobic floor with a sponge-like ceiling. When placed beneath operating electronics, moisture trapped in the ceiling vaporizes beneath emerging hotspots. The vapor escapes toward the floor, taking hea... » read more

System Bits: April 11


Tiny transistors made from self-assembled carbon nanotubes While carbon nanotubes can be used to make very small electronic devices, they are difficult to handle. Now, researchers from the University of Groningen, the University of Wuppertal, and IBM Zurich, have developed a method to select semiconducting nanotubes from a solution, and make them self-assemble on a circuit of gold electrodes. ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 31


Microbial nanowires Microbiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have discovered a new type of microbial nanowire, the protein filaments that bacteria use to make electrical connections with other microbes or minerals. The team was motivated by the potential for improved "green" conducting materials for electronics. According to Derek Lovley, professor of... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 24


Printable circuits with silver nanowires Scientists at Duke University compared the conductivity of films made from different shapes of silver nanostructures and found that electrons move through films made of silver nanowires much easier than films made from other shapes, like nanospheres or microflakes. In fact, electrons flowed so easily through the nanowire films that they could function... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 6


Carbon nanotube transistors outperform silicon University of Wisconsin-Madison materials engineers created carbon nanotube transistors that outperform silicon transistors, improving the current 1.9 times. The new transistors are particularly promising for wireless communications technologies that require a lot of current flowing across a relatively small area. "This achievement has been a... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 4


Superfast fluorescence Duke University researchers developed an ultrafast light-emitting device, pushing semiconductor quantum dots to emit light at more than 90 gigahertz. This device could one day be used in optical computing chips or for optical communication between traditional electronic microchips. The new speed record was set using plasmonics. When a laser shines on the surface of ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 17


Harvesting energy from light In a finding they believe could improve technologies for generating electricity from solar energy and lead to more efficient optoelectronic devices used in communications, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University have demonstrated a new mechanism for extracting energy from light. They said the process is much more efficient than conven... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 10


Enabling flexible touchscreens While transparent conductors make touchscreens possible, the cost and the physical limitations of the material these conductors are usually made of are hampering progress toward flexible touchscreen devices but a research collaboration between the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University has shown a new a way to design transparent conductors using metal nan... » read more

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