Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 6

Carbon nanotube transistors outperform silicon University of Wisconsin-Madison materials engineers created carbon nanotube transistors that outperform silicon transistors, improving the current 1.9 times. The new transistors are particularly promising for wireless communications technologies that require a lot of current flowing across a relatively small area. "This achievement has been a... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 4

Superfast fluorescence Duke University researchers developed an ultrafast light-emitting device, pushing semiconductor quantum dots to emit light at more than 90 gigahertz. This device could one day be used in optical computing chips or for optical communication between traditional electronic microchips. The new speed record was set using plasmonics. When a laser shines on the surface of ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 17

Harvesting energy from light In a finding they believe could improve technologies for generating electricity from solar energy and lead to more efficient optoelectronic devices used in communications, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University have demonstrated a new mechanism for extracting energy from light. They said the process is much more efficient than conven... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 10

Enabling flexible touchscreens While transparent conductors make touchscreens possible, the cost and the physical limitations of the material these conductors are usually made of are hampering progress toward flexible touchscreen devices but a research collaboration between the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University has shown a new a way to design transparent conductors using metal nan... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 3

Maintaining an unstable quantum system In an experiment that could have implications for quantum computers and quantum simulators, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have demonstrated a way to maintain an unstable quantum system by applying bursts of microwave radiation – a quantum analog to vibrating the inverted pendulum. While a simple pendulum has two equilibrium point... » read more