IoT – And A Tear In The Fabric Of The Connected World

Billions of connected things. Massive silicon consumption. Exponentially rising data volumes. Global compute farm build-out to make sense out of all of it. Lots of dollar signs. Everyone is talking about IoT with an optimistic view toward the future. There is a dark side to all this. Many, including yours truly have written about it. If you’re familiar with the Terminator series, you can call... » read more

Find The Best IP For You

It can be quite challenging and time consuming to find the right semiconductor IP for your project. You’ve got to find IP that does not consume too much power, meets your performance target, has the lowest leakage when your product goes on standby, and last but not least, IP that occupies the least amount of expensive real estate on your chip. How can you accomplish such a task without having... » read more

2.5D Surprises And Alternatives

Semiconductor Engineering sat to discuss advanced packaging issues with Juan Rey, senior director of engineering for Calibre at [getentity id="22017" e_name="Mentor Graphics"]; Max Min, senior technical manager at [getentity id="22865" e_name="Samsung"]; and Lisa Minwell, [getentity id="22242" e_name="eSilicon's"] senior director of IP marketing. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. ... » read more

What Can Go Wrong In Automotive

Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss automotive engineering with Jinesh Jain, supervisor for advanced architectures in Ford’s Research and Innovation Center in Palo Alto; Raed Shatara, market development for automotive infotainment at [getentity id="22331" comment="STMicroelectronics"]; Joe Hupcey, verification product technologist at [getentity id="22017" e_name="Mentor Graphics"]; ... » read more

Building Chips That Can Learn

The idea that devices can learn optimal behavior rather than relying on more generalized hardware and software is driving a resurgence in artificial intelligence, machine leaning, and cognitive computing. But architecting, building and testing these kinds of systems will require broad changes that ultimately could impact the entire semiconductor ecosystem. Many of these changes are wel... » read more

Designers: Take Control Of Your Chip

This is a familiar story for us – maybe it is for you, too. From time to time, a customer contacts us and says they have a design in mind, but they just can’t fit in the package, or meet the power budget, or meet timing. Fifty percent or more of the area for many of the chips we see is composed of memory. So we start there. After a Pareto analysis of the memory sub-system, we typically find... » read more

The Week In Review: Design

Tools Real Intent updated its Ascent Lint product, adding 50 new customer-driven rules, improved support of VHDL and System Verilog, and a new database-driven debugger with an integrated source browser and improved schematic visualization. IP ARM launched a new real-time processor with advanced safety features for autonomous vehicles and medical and industrial robots. The processor, Co... » read more

Plugging Holes In Machine Learning

The number of companies using machine learning is accelerating, but so far there are no tools to validate, verify and debug these systems. That presents a problem for the chipmakers and systems companies that increasingly rely on machine learning to optimize their technology because, at least for now, it creates the potential for errors that are extremely difficult to trace and fix. At the s... » read more

Focus Shifts To Architectures

Chipmakers increasingly are relying on architectural and micro-architectural changes as the best hope for improving power and performance across a spectrum of markets, process nodes and price points. While discussion about the death of [getkc id="74" comment="Moore's Law"] predates the 1-micron process node, there is no question that it is getting harder for even the largest chipmakers to st... » read more

What’s Missing From Machine Learning

Machine learning is everywhere. It's being used to optimize complex chips, balance power and performance inside of data centers, program robots, and to keep expensive electronics updated and operating. What's less obvious, though, is there are no commercially available tools to validate, verify and debug these systems once machines evolve beyond the final specification. The expectation is th... » read more

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