Manufacturing Bits: May 3


DNA thermometers The University of Montreal has taken DNA and built the world’s smallest thermometer. The programmable DNA thermometer is 5nm, or 20,000 times smaller than a human hair. Applications for the technology include cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedicine, nanoelectronics and synthetic biology, according to the University of Montreal. Researchers added optical reporters to D... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 22


Superconductor puddles Superconductors are devices that have zero electrical resistance, making them attractive for a range of applications. But superconductors must be cooled down to temperatures near zero to work, which, in turn, limits their applications. High-temperature superconductors are more promising technologies, but once again, they must be cooled down to function. The industr... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 8


World’s pressure record The University of Bayreuth and the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) have set another world’s record for the highest static pressure ever achieved in a lab. Researchers were able to demonstrate metal osmium at pressures of up to 770 Gigapascals (GPa). Osmium is one of the world’s most incompressible metals. The 770 GPa figure is about 130 GPa higher than ... » read more