Changes In China


By Jesse Zhang, SEMI China Industry leaders gathered in Beijing at BIMS 2016 — the Beijing International Microelectronics Symposium — to discuss growth opportunities for the semiconductor industry and the mobile communications market. The 17th session of BIMS was co-sponsored by SEMI and the Chinese-American Semiconductor Professionals Association (CASPA). For 17 years, BIMS has provi... » read more

Stepping Back From Scaling


Architectures, packaging and software are becoming core areas for semiconductor research and development, setting the stage for a series of shifts that will impact a large swath of the semiconductor industry. While there is still demand from the largest chipmakers for increased density at the next process node, the underlying economics for foundries, equipment vendors and IP developers are f... » read more

It’s All About DRAM


For decades, the starting point for compute architectures was the processor. In the future, it likely will be the DRAM architecture. Dynamic random access memory always has played a big role in computing. Since IBM's Robert Dennard invented DRAM back in 1966, it has become the gold standard for off-chip memory. It's fast, cheap, reliable, and at least until about 20nm, it has scaled quite n... » read more

The Week In Review: Design/IoT


Tools Synopsys unveiled a new custom design solution targeting FinFET layout, introducing visually-assisted routing automation, a built-in design rule checking engine, templates to apply previous layout decisions to new designs, and IC Compiler integration. TSMC certified the new tool for 10nm and 7nm FinFET process technologies. It has also been adopted by STMicroelectronics, GSI Technology... » read more

New Memory Approaches And Issues


New memory types and approaches are being developed and tested as DRAM and Moore's Law both run out of steam, adding greatly to the confusion of what comes next and how that will affect chip designs. What fits where in the memory hierarchy is becoming less clear as the semiconductor industry grapples with these changes. New architectures, such as [getkc id="202" kc_name="fan-outs"] and [getk... » read more

Optimizing LPDDR4 Performance And Power With Multi-Channel Architectures


PDDR4 offers huge bandwidth in a physically small PCB area and volume; up to 25.6 GByte/s of bandwidth at a 3,200 Mbps data rate from a single 15mmx15mm LPDDR4 package when two dies are packaged together. LPDDR4 builds on the success of LPDDR2 and LPDDR3 by adding new features and introducing a major architectural change. This white paper explains how LPDDR4 is different from all previous JEDEC... » read more

Overcoming The Design Bottleneck


SoCs control most advanced electronics these days and functionality, quality, power and security are a combination of both hardware and software. All throughout the development of today's complex systems, the memory hierarchy has remained the same—preserving the notion of a continuous computing paradigm. Today, that decision is leading to performance and power issues. There are several rea... » read more

How Is Your HBM Memory?


The seemingly countless applications used every day requiring web access (social media, streaming video, games, etc.) are not only driving the need to store a tremendous amount of data, but also driving the need to access this data with as little delay as possible. Add to this list the growing number of connected devices (IoT), and you can see why changes in the data center are needed, in parti... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 14


Monster waves of light The FOM Institute AMOLF has observed what researchers call monster waves of light. In this phenomenon, monster waves of light appear from nowhere and then disappear again. Researchers have shown that it is possible to influence the probability of this phenomenon. As a result, the technology could lead to faster telecommunication systems or more sensitive sensors, acco... » read more

The Week In Review: Manufacturing


Look out below! Intel has lowered its first-quarter revenue outlook. The company now expects first-quarter revenue to be $12.8 billion, plus or minus $300 million, compared to the previous expectation of $13.7 billion, plus or minus $500 million. “Intel may be experiencing greater-than-expected seasonal declines in both notebooks and desktops,” said Doug Freedman, an analyst with RBC Capita... » read more

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