What Does An IoT Chip Look Like?


By Ed Sperling and Jeff Dorsch Internet of Things chip design sounds like a simple topic on the face of it. Look deeper, though, and it becomes clear there is no single IoT, and certainly no type of chip that will work across the ever-expanding number of applications and markets that collectively make up the IoT. Included under this umbrella term are sensors, various types of processors, ... » read more

The Week In Review: Design


M&A Ansys acquired Computational Engineering International (CEI), the developer of a suite of products that helps analyze, visualize and communicate simulation data. Founded in 1994 as a spin-off from Cray Research, the company's program covers a wide range of data formats. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. IP Efabless launched an open source framework that allows community members... » read more

The Week In Review: Design


Numbers EDA industry revenue increased 10.5% in Q1 2017 to $2.168 billion, the highest Q1 growth level since 2011, according to EDAC. The four quarters moving average increased by 10.6%. CAE, the biggest category, grew 14%, while IP—primarily macro cells and memory—grew 15%. The Americas and Asia-Pacific both reported double digit growth. The industry is hiring, too: tracked companies incr... » read more

IoT Startups Rake In Cash


Corporate and venture investors are still eagerly backing Internet of Things startups, with more than $850 million committed during the first six months of 2017. This year’s total may not reach the heights of 2014, when investors put more than $5 billion into IoT startups, or 2016, which saw IoT firms receiving about $4.75 billion, the Venture Scanner website estimates. Still, a once white... » read more

The Black Box In Auto Vehicles


Driving a modern car or truck today is like driving a complex computer system which has the scope to take people and freight from one geographic point to another through the infrastructure and, to do so, it just happens it has an engine and wheels. Among the most significant developments in automotive electronics in the last several years is the inclusion of an EDR (Event Data Recorder) in e... » read more

Safety Plus Security: Solutions And Methodologies


By Ed Sperling & Brian Bailey As more technology makes its way into safety-critical markets—and as more of those devices are connected to the Internet—security issues are beginning to merge with safety issues. The number of attempted cyberattacks is up on every front, which has big implications for devices used in safety-related applications. There are more viruses, ransomware, an... » read more

Autonomous Cars Drive New Software


Autonomous driving and other advanced features will require much more sophisticated software than what is used in vehicles today. To make this all work will require complex algorithms as well as co-designed hardware, which can make real-time decisions to avoid accidents and adjust to changing road conditions. Automobiles already take advantage of sophisticated software executed by a variety ... » read more

Self-Driving Cars Rattle Supply Chain


Automotive compute workloads are consolidating as carmakers push toward autonomous vehicles, but the changes necessary to make this all work are causing huge disruptions in an industry that has fine-tuned its supply chain over more than a century. Consolidation is essential for a variety of reasons, including efficiency of the computations, complexity management, and lower deployment costs. ... » read more

Intelligent Compute Engines Driving Today’s Automobiles Need Better Security


Driving a modern car or truck today is like driving a complex computer system which has the capability to transport people and freight from a geographic point to another through the road infrastructure and, to do so, it just happens it has an engine and wheels. With automotive systems moving towards consolidation of workloads, there is a need and benefit of having faster networking throughpu... » read more

Side-Channel Attacks


There are many techniques available for hackers to gain access to a system and obtain secret keys or other proprietary information– from invasive methods, such as microprobing, to noninvasive methods, such as cryptoanalysis. However, one of the easiest and most effective ways to extract the contents of a chip is through a side-channel attack using power analysis. To read more, click here. » read more

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