Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 4


China’s powerful laser The Shanghai Superintense-Ultrafast Lasers Facility (SULF) in China claims to have demonstrated the world’s most powerful laser. The ultra-intense, ultra-fast laser is said to have delivered a peak power of more than five petawatts. This is supposedly the largest peak-power laser pulse ever measured on record. A petawatt is equivalent to one quadrillion watts. ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 24


Microbunching EUV Researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have provided a status report on its ongoing efforts to develop a steady-state microbunching (SSMB) technology. SSMB is a technology used within a storage ring, which is a large-scale, circular particle accelerator. An SSMB mechanism produces a high-power radiation source within the ring. This, in turn, could enable a... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 29


Brain-inspired computing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has purchased a brain-inspired supercomputing platform for deep learning developed by IBM Research. Based on a neurosynaptic computer chip called IBM TrueNorth, the scalable platform will process the equivalent of 16 million neurons and 4 billion synapses. It will consume the energy equivalent of a tablet computer. ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: June 23


Diamond shock waves For years, the industry has been exploring the use of diamonds for electronics applications. Diamonds could be used to reduce heat in electronic systems. In addition, diamond FETs are also intriguing. Diamond has a wide bandgap (5.45 eV), a high breakdown field (10MV/cm), and high thermal conductivity (22W/cmK). But it could take years before diamond FETs reach the mains... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 26


Table-top EUV Swinburne University of Technology has developed a table-top extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser power source. The source could be used to develop a system for use in metrology and other applications. The table-top setup is a new way to generate bright beams of coherent EUV radiation. It may offer a cost-effective alternative to large-scale facilities, such as synchrotrons or free... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 5


Transparent armor The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed transparent armor. The technology is actually a hard transparent ceramic, based on a material called spinel. Spinel is a magnesium aluminate compound. Spinel is also a gemstone, which could come in various colors. NRL has devised a fabrication process to create the technology, which is harder and superior to glass, sap... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 17


Swedish nano Sweden’s Lund University plans to build a pilot production facility for startups in the field of nanotechnology. The facility would be used for Swedish companies and researchers to build products. This is for companies who do not have the funds to build their own facilities or buy expensive equipment. The project originates from the successful research into nanowires at Lund ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 16


Making sounds with atoms What is the sound of one hand clapping? Perhaps a better question is what is the sound of an atom? Chalmers University of Technology has demonstrated the ability to make a sound with an atom. More specifically, researchers have made acoustic waves with an artificial atom. In doing so, researchers have demonstrated quantum physics with sound taking on the role of lig... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 1


Portable laser weapons For years, the U.S. military has been developing high-energy laser (HEL) weapons. But the massive size, weight and power requirements of laser systems limit their use on many military platforms. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has made a breakthrough in its so-called Excalibur program. The program will develop laser weapons that are 10 times ligh... » read more