The Limits Of Parallelism


Parallelism used to be the domain of supercomputers working on weather simulations or plutonium decay. It is now part of the architecture of most SoCs. But just how efficient, effective and widespread has parallelism really become? There is no simple answer to that question. Even for a dual-core implementation of a processor on a chip, results can vary greatly by software application, operat... » read more

Better Heterogeneous CPU Designs


The trend toward heterogeneous CPU designs is growing. Case in point: The NXP i.MX7 family of devices have such a design. In this blog, I will discuss the (simple) steps necessary to get the most out of i.MX7 using the ARM Development Studio, more commonly known as DS-5, but the information applies to most similar systems. Compiling code depends greatly on the use case. Within DS-5, there... » read more

DVFS On The Sidelines


Power reduction is one of the most important aspects of chip design these days, but not all power reduction techniques are used equally. Some that were once important are fading and dynamic voltage, and frequency scaling (DVFS) is one of them. What's changed, and will we see a resurgence in the future? What is it? DVFS has physics powerfully in its favor. As Vinod Viswanath, director of res... » read more

Changes In The Cloud


I wrapped up an exciting week last Friday at the inaugural NFV World Congress at the Doubletree Hotel in San Jose last week, where more than 1,000 stakeholders had gathered to convey, debate, discuss and learn about the vision for the next-generation cloud and networking infrastructure. One of the highlights of the week was the OPNFV mini-summit to communicate the tremendous progress that t... » read more

The Emergence Of The OpenDataPlane Standard


With the great expansion of networks to encompass exabytes of traffic, billions of mobile devices, and billions more endpoints in the Internet of Things, a new era of creative network usage and applications is upon us. The exciting advances in network services ― such as 4G and 5G ― are leading to the acknowledgement by silicon vendors and application developers of the important role of work... » read more

Making Software Better


Gauging the energy efficiency of software is a difficult task. There are many types of software, from embedded code all the way up to software that controls various modes of operation to downloaded applications. Some software interacts with other software, while other software works independently. And some works better on one SoC configuration than another, or on one iteration of an operating s... » read more

The Growing Legacy Of Moore’s Law


By Ed Sperling Moore’s Law has defined semiconductor design since it was introduced in 1965, but increasingly it also has begun defining the manufacturing equipment, the cooling needed for end devices, and both the heat and performance of systems. In the equipment sector the big problem has been the delay in rolling out extreme ultraviolet (EUV). Moore’s Law will require tighter spacing... » read more

Where’s The Multicore Software?


By David Lammers Multicore processors are being readied for embedded applications but software developers will need to get prepared if they expect to wring the maximum benefits from them. Rob Oshana, director of software R&D at Freescale Semiconductor’s networking and multimedia group, said software developers increasingly are asking if their code will easily port to multicore CPUs. ... » read more