Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 12

Incandescent bulbs might not be dead yet Can incandescent bulbs be as efficient – or even more so – than LEDs? More than 95 percent of the energy that goes into incandescents is wasted, most of it as heat, so researchers at MIT and Purdue University struck out to see if that could be changed. A conventional heated metal filament, with all its attendant losses, served as the basis. But... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 10

Singing to your storage Existing research on 'racetrack memory', which uses tiny magnetic wires, each one hundreds of times thinner than a human hair, down which magnetic bits of data run like racing cars around a track, has focused on using either magnetic fields or electric currents to move the data bits down the wires. However, both these options create heat and reduce power efficiency. ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 18

Reducing crosstalk with tantalum oxide memories Scientists at Rice University created a solid-state memory technology that allows for high-density storage with a minimum incidence of crosstalk errors. The memories are based on tantalum oxide. Applying voltage to a 250-nanometer-thick sandwich of graphene, tantalum, nanoporous tantalum oxide and platinum creates addressable bits where the ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 5

Single material batteries Engineers at the University of Maryland created a battery made entirely out of a single material that, by incorporating the properties of both the electrodes and electrolyte, can both move electricity and store it. The reason the new battery is revolutionary is because it solves the problem of what happens at the interface between the electrolyte and the electrod... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: March 24

Power from packing peanuts After setting up a new lab, a Purdue University research team was left with a problem: mountains of packing peanuts. Instead of filling bags destined for a dumpster, the team saw an opportunity to find the packing material a useful purpose. The result was a process to convert waste packing peanuts into high-performance carbon electrodes for rechargeable lithium-... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: March 10

Simulated memories Resistance-switching cells hold promise as a faster, higher capacity, lower power replacement for current non-volatile memory. Yet "the mechanisms that govern their remarkable properties have been poorly understood, limiting our ability to assess the ultimate performance and potential for commercialization," said Alejandro Strachan, professor of materials engineering at Pu... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: March 3

Black phosphorus photodetectors Phosphorus, a highly reactive element commonly found in match heads, tracer bullets, and fertilizers, can be turned into a stable crystalline form known as black phosphorus. In a new study, researchers from the University of Minnesota used an ultrathin black phosphorus film 20 atoms thick to demonstrate high-speed data communication on nanoscale optical circui... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 17

What can snails teach us about creating batteries? Evgenia Barannikova, a graduate student at University of Maryland, Baltimore County presented the current state of research in using biology to improve the properties of lithium ion batteries at the 59th annual meeting of the Biophysical Society, held Feb. 7-11 in Baltimore, Maryland. One of the inspirations for her research was the way t... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 3

Bulletproof vests for batteries It was almost two years ago that the Boeing Dreamliner was grounded because of fires caused by its lithium-ion batteries. Now researchers at the University of Michigan have used nanofibers extracted from Kevlar, best known as the material in bulletproof vests, to create a new barrier between the electrodes in a lithium-ion battery. Lithium atoms in batterie... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 27

Improving batteries By digging into the complex science behind the formation of dendrites that cause lithium-ion batteries to fail, research by Purdue University engineers could bring safer, longer-lasting batteries capable of being charged within minutes instead of hours. According to the researchers, dendrites form on anode electrodes and may continue to grow until causing an internal sho... » read more

← Older posts