Power/Performance Bits: June 21


A chip with 1,000 processors A microchip containing 1,000 independent programmable processors has been designed by a team at the University of California, Davis. Called the KiloCore chip, it contains 621 million transistors and was fabricated by IBM using its 32nm CMOS technology. Cores operate at an average maximum clock frequency of 1.78 GHz, and they transfer data directly to each other r... » read more

Executive Insight: Frankwell Lin


Semiconductor Engineering sat down with Frankwell Lin, president and co-founder of [getentity id="22866" e_name="Andes Technology"], to talk about the IoT, what's required in devices and what will likely change over the next few years. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. SE: What are the big market opportunities in the Asia/Pacific region? Lin: The big market is the [getkc id=... » read more

Experts At The Table: Multi-Core And Many-Core


By Ed Sperling Low-Power Engineering sat down with Naveed Sherwani, CEO of Open-Silicon; Amit Rohatgi, principal mobile architect at MIPS; Grant Martin, chief scientist at Tensilica; Bill Neifert, CTO at Carbon Design Systems; and Kevin McDermott, director of market development for ARM’s System Design Division. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. LPE: Computers aren’t gettin... » read more

Multicore: Is More Better?


By Frank Ferro Two cores are better than one, right? It reminds me of those AT&T commercials where they ask the kids, “Who thinks two is better than one?” And of course the kids all yell, two! In another version of the commercial they ask; “What’s better, doing two things at once or just one?” And again they all yell, two! Well, this is a good summary or of last week’s Multicor... » read more

Low Power Drives New Architectures


By Pallab Chatterjee Power became the driving discussion at several major events last month. The global cries for energy reduction, which have been mainstream since the early 1970s on the political level, have now moved to being real economic realities for component and systems suppliers. Chipmakers are finding that lower power makes good economic sense—lower cost of packaging, lower cost... » read more

Experts At The Table: Multi-Core And Many-Core


By Ed Sperling Low-Power Engineering sat down with Naveed Sherwani, CEO of Open-Silicon; Amit Rohatgi, principal mobile architect at MIPS; Grant Martin, chief scientist at Tensilica; Bill Neifert, CTO at Carbon Design Systems; and Kevin McDermott, director of market development for ARM’s System Design Division. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. LPE: How does cloud computing... » read more

Experts At The Table: Multi-Core And Many-Core


By Ed Sperling Low-Power Engineering sat down with Naveed Sherwani, CEO of Open-Silicon; Amit Rohatgi, principal mobile architect at MIPS; Grant Martin, chief scientist at Tensilica; Bill Neifert, CTO at Carbon Design Systems; and Kevin McDermott, director of market development for ARM’s System Design Division. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. LPE: Is software taking advan... » read more

Experts At The Table: Multi-Core And Many-Core


By Ed Sperling Low-Power Engineering sat down with Naveed Sherwani, CEO of Open-Silicon; Amit Rohatgi, principal mobile architect at MIPS; Grant Martin, chief scientist at Tensilica; Bill Neifert, CTO at Carbon Design Systems; and Kevin McDermott, director of market development for ARM’s System Design Division. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. LPE: Computers aren’t gettin... » read more

The New Multicore Approach


It’s probably too harsh to say that multicore has been a failure, but it’s flat-out wrong to say it has been successful. Multicore was an inevitable outgrowth of Moore’s Law. You simply can’t keep turning up the frequency for processors at advanced nodes without cooking the chip into oblivion. In theory, four cores running at a much cooler 1GHz should be better than one core running... » read more

Performance Plus Lower Power


By Pallab Chatterjee Power and performance often have been seen as something of a tradeoff. Chipmakers focus on one or the other, or they extract a little improvement in both at each new process node. That way of thinking is changing, though. At the recent Linley processor conference, the central theme for both standalone and embedded processors was that architectures have to optimized for ... » read more

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