Coherence Times Of Bose-Einstein Condensates Beyond The Shot-Noise Limit Via Superfluid Shielding


Source: Cornell University Library 10/26/16 "We demonstrate a new way to extend the coherence time of separated Bose-Einstein condensates that involves immersion into a superfluid bath. When both the system and the bath have similar scattering lengths, immersion in a superfluid bath cancels out inhomogeneous potentials either imposed by external fields or inherent in density fluctuations due... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 10


Atom interferometers The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has devised one of the world’s most accurate atom interferometers. Interferometry is a common measurement technique. Basically, the technology looks at electromagnetic waves. The waves are superimposed to extract information. One interferometry technology type, called an atom interferometer, utilizes the waves of ato... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 3


Clues to high-temp superconductivity Offering clues about the microscopic origins of high-temperature superconductivity, physicists at Rice University’s Center for Quantum Materials (RCQM) have created a new iron-based material. The material is a formulation of iron, sodium, copper and arsenic created by Rice graduate student Yu Song in the laboratory of physicist Pengcheng Dai. The recip... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 27


Melting quantum crystal of electrons Confirming a fundamental phase transition in quantum mechanics that was theoretically proposed more than 80 years ago but not experimentally documented until now, MIT researchers reported that they’ve observed a highly ordered crystal of electrons in a semiconducting material and documented its melting, much like ice thawing into water. The team said i... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 20


Removing quasiparticles from superconducting quantum circuits improves lifetime Given that an important prerequisite for the realization of high-performance quantum computers is that the stored data should remain intact for as long as possible, an international team of scientists at European interdisciplinary research institute Forschungszentrum Jülich has succeeded in making further improvem... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Dec. 20


Stamping with electronic ink Engineers at MIT fabricated a stamp made from carbon nanotubes that is able to print electronic inks onto rigid and flexible surfaces. The team's stamping process should be able to print transistors small enough to control individual pixels in high-resolution displays and touchscreens, said A. John Hart, associate professor of contemporary technology and mecha... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 13


Data, code sharing standards for computational studies While reporting new research results involves detailed descriptions of methods and materials used in an experiment, when a study uses computers to analyze data, create models or simulate things that can’t be tested in a lab, how can other researchers see what steps were taken or potentially reproduce results? To this end, a new report by... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 6


Teaching computers to read A multidisciplinary team of UCLA researchers has built a computational model that reflects how humans think and communicate, by designing an algorithm that examined nearly two million posts from popular parenting websites, thereby teaching computers to understand structured narratives within the flow of posts on the internet. Managing large-scale data in this way ... » read more

The Week In Review: IoT


Management Intel has hired Tom Lantzsch, the executive vice president of strategy at ARM Holdings, to serve as senior vice president and general manager of its IoT Group, effective in January. Lantzsch succeeds Douglas Davis, a senior vice president who was running the IoT Group and had announced plans to retire from Intel after more than 30 years. Davis reconsidered that move, however; he wil... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 29


Supersonic kinetic spraying Low-cost flexible electronics could enable a new class of products, such as roll-up displays, wearable electronics, flexible solar cells and electronic skin. There is a major barrier to enable these technologies, however. The problem is to make flexible transparent conducting films that are scalable and economical. The University of Illinois at Chicago and Kor... » read more

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