OLEDs Shine In Phones, TVs, Lights

OLEDs are coming—everywhere. While the new iPhone 7 models do not have organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays, those handsets are likely to be the last Apple will offer before it makes the smartphone transition to OLED displays next year. The Apple Watch, however, does have a flexible OLED display with a sapphire crystal cover or an Ion-X glass cover, and the Apple Watch Series 2 ... » read more

CPU, GPU or … VPU?

Where is the semiconductor industry going in the post-smartphone era? What trends are going to shape next-generation applications and SoC development? Just by walking around the CES show floor this year, I would say advanced visual processing technology is the horse to put money on. It was everywhere, from ADAS systems, drones, to GoPro cameras, IP cameras with embedded facial recognition, m... » read more

Inside The Quantum Dot

Quantum dots, a relatively new and emerging technology, are creating a buzz in the industry. Basically, when inserted into an LCD TV, quantum dots can boost the color gamut in the display, enabling vivid picture quality with relatively little capital. Quantum dots can also be used in other applications, such as solar and LED lighting. To get a handle on the technology, Semiconductor Enginee... » read more

Making Flexible OLED Displays

Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are supposedly the next big thing in display technology. In fact, over the years, several display makers have spent billions of dollars to build new and large OLED fabs. To be sure, OLEDs enable brighter displays, as compared to traditional LCD technology. OLEDs use a series of thin, light-emitting films, which enables the display to produce brighter li... » read more

Chasing After Quantum Dots

In the 1980s, researchers stumbled upon a tiny particle or nanocrystal with unique electrical properties. These mysterious nanocrystals, which are based on semiconductor materials, were later named quantum dots. Quantum dots were curiosity items until 2013, when Sony launched the world’s first LCD TV using these inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals. Basically, when inserted into an LCD TV,... » read more

Bigger, Brighter TVs

The flat panel display (FPD) industry is undergoing a renaissance, with suppliers rolling out a dizzying array of new, high-resolution technologies for mobile devices, computers and TVs. But despite being in the eye of the innovation storm, FPD equipment makers remain cautious—and for good reason. There are a slew of new LCD fabs being built today, mostly in China. This, in turn, is promp... » read more

5 Technologies To Watch

The industry is developing a dizzying array of new technologies. In fact, there are more new and innovative technologies than ever before. And the list is countless. At least from my vantage point, I have come up with my own list of the top five technologies to watch in 2015 and beyond. They are listed in alphabetical order. (See below). Obviously, there are more than just five technologi... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 27

Calibration systems go portable The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is selling a new portable, vacuum-based calibration unit for use in instruments and other systems. The system, dubbed the Portable Vacuum Standard (PVS), is a compact unit that enables precise calibrations and measurements at a customer’s facility. Housed in the white “igloo” enclosure, the syste... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 11

Plastic smartwatch displays LG Display has begun production of what the company claims is the world’s first circular plastic OLED (P-OLED) display. The P-OLED is the display for the company’s new smartwatch, the LG G Watch R. Based on the Android Wear operating system, the smartwatch is powered by Qualcomm’s 1.2-GHz Snapdragon 400 processor. It also has 4GB of storage and 512MB of RAM... » read more

OLED Displacing LCD, But Not Affecting Industry Leaders

By Michael P.C. Watts One of the most common themes in high tech is how companies fail to deal with game-changing new products. Think about Kodak and digital cameras, Sony and the flash memory music player, Microsoft and the tablet, GE and Osram and the Light Emitting Diode (LED). The overwhelming conclusion seems to be that you have to be committed to making your own most valuable product red... » read more