Introduction to ARM Cortex-M23 And Cortex-M33 Processors With TrustZone For ARMv8-M

Given the rising demand for IoT, next generation ARM® Cortex-M processors have been designed with the technology required to become the security foundation for all embedded systems. The Cortex-M23 and Cortex-M33 processors maintain the expected characteristics of the embbeded profile such as real-time deterministic interrupt response, low power, low area, ease of development, and 32-bit perfor... » read more

Making Waves In Deep Learning

A little more than two and a half years ago I wrote Making Waves in Low-Power Design, an article about a company (at the time) called Wave Semiconductor. Fast forward the the recent Linley Processor Conference, Wave Computing’s CTO Chris Nicol gave the audience an update on the company’s eagerly awaited and soon (planned for October) to be taped-out 16K-core dataflow processor for deep lea... » read more

Executive Insight: Simon Segars

Simon Segars, CEO of ARM, examines the future of mobile computing, how it intersects with the IoT, why ecosystems are vital, and how computing is evolving. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. SE: Most analysts say the growth rate of mobile is slowing. The big buzz phrase now is Internet of Things. How does ARM's role change with that shift? Segars: Mobile is still changing and... » read more

Why This Roadmap Matters

The semiconductor industry is now officially looking beyond PCs and servers, establishing metrics and guidance for existing and developing market segments rather than just focusing on how to get to the next process nodes. The IEEE's International Roadmap for Devices and Systems marks a fundamental shift in the industry. The uncertainty that has ensued ever since the introduction of 3D transi... » read more

2026: I Can Only Imagine…

It was fun to see all of the new products that were rolled out this year at CES. It got me thinking about how much technology has advanced in the past 10 years. In 2006, the iPhone was still a year away from being introduced and we hadn’t discovered tablets yet. The Internet wasn’t mobile and the cloud was still something in the sky. Never mind Fitbits, smart watches, augmented reality or a... » read more

Remove The Bus From Your Embedded System

For many years, the 8-bit microcontroller has been the workhorse of embedded systems. Design teams favor the size and power benefits that a tightly coupled processor, such as the 8051 microcontroller, brings to their designs. The compact and ultra-low power 8-bit architecture improves battery life and reduces bill-of-material costs. However, embedded systems increasingly require higher perfo... » read more

Are More Processor Cores Better?

Up until the early 2000s, each generation of processor was faster, used more exotic architectures, had deeper pipelines, used more transistors, ran at higher clock frequencies and consumed more power. In fact power was rising faster than performance and led to the extrapolation that within a few generations, processors would run as hot as nuclear reactors. Something had to change, and that c... » read more

The Multicore Processing Conundrum

We drive relentlessly into our technological future and often it seems like we’re upgrading our high-performance vehicle as it speeds forward. That’s no easy task, to be sure. We were roaring along fine, observing Moore’s Law, and then we hit a speed bump. So design teams quickly adopted multi-core designs to compensate for the fact that pushing up speeds on single-core CPUs was a melt... » read more

A Decade At The Ceiling

This month marks the tenth anniversary of the introduction of the Intel Pentium 4 HT 570J, which had an advertised operating frequency of 3.8 GHz. It was manufactured in a 90nm process, had a VID voltage range of 1.2V-1.425V and was rated at 115W TDP. In a previous article, Power to Fly, we looked at the graph that I’m including again here below for reference. The microprocessor indu... » read more

Making Chips Run Faster

For all the talk about low power, the real focus of most chipmakers is still performance. The reality is that OEMs might be willing to sacrifice increasing performance for longer battery life, but they will rarely lower performance to reach that goal. This is more obvious for some applications than others. A machine monitor probably isn’t the place where performance will make much of a dif... » read more

← Older posts