Executive Committee Members You Need To Know…


Time is the only critic without ambition. – John Steinbeck Like many things, DAC looks decidedly different depending on where you sit, and how you experience it. As an attendee, it’s mostly a few days at the start of every summer where you can sample some of the best technical content on the design of circuits and systems, plus get the chance to network and have some fun with a worldwide... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 8


Optimizing multiprocessor programs for non-experts While ‘dynamic programming’ is a technique that yields efficient solutions to computational problems in economics, genomic analysis, and other fields, adapting it to multicore chips requires a level of programming expertise that few economists and biologists have. But researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence La... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 4


Light deflection through fog In a development that could lead to computer vision systems that work in fog or drizzle, which have been a major obstacle to self-driving cars, MIT researchers have developed a technique for recovering visual information from light that has scattered because of interactions with the environment — such as passing through human tissue. This technology — called... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 20


Improving Torque Sensing In an advance that could bring new types of sensors and studies in quantum mechanics, Purdue University researchers have levitated a tiny nanodiamond particle with a laser in a vacuum chamber, using the technique for the first time to detect and measure its torsional vibration. The team said the experiment represents a nanoscale version of the torsion balance used i... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 13


Big data programming language MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) researchers this week are presenting a new programming language, called Milk, that lets application developers manage memory more efficiently in programs that deal with scattered data points in large data sets. The researchers reminded that in today’s computer chips, memory management is base... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 30


Probing photon-electron interactions According to Rice University researchers, where light and matter intersect, the world illuminates; where they interact so strongly that they become one, they illuminate a world of new physics. Here, the team is closing in on a way to create a new condensed matter state in which all the electrons in a material act as one by manipulating them with light and a... » read more

System Bits: June 28


Deep-learning-based virtual reality tool Given that future systems which enable people to interact with virtual environments will require computers to interpret the human hand’s nearly endless variety and complexity of changing motions and joint angles, Purdue University researchers have created a convolutional neural network-based system that is capable of deep learning. [caption id="att... » read more

System Bits: May 17


AI drives Toyota websites An innovation in artificial intelligence described in a 2001 paper by UCLA computer science professor Adnan Darwiche has found a somewhat unexpected application: helping car buyers of Toyota and Lexus customize their vehicles online. The websites let shoppers tailor their vehicle from among a range of models, colors and accessories. The software that powers the sit... » read more

System Bits: May 10


Topological insulators In a finding that could open up a new pathway to advanced electronic devices and even robust quantum computer architecture, researchers from MIT; Oak Ridge, and Argonne National Laboratories; the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Bochum, Germany; the Institute for Theoretical Solid State Physics in Dresden; the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris; and the Institute of N... » read more

System Bits: May 3


Neural network synapses In a development that could potentially be used as a basis for the hardware implementation of artificial neural networks, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) researchers have created prototypes of electronic synapses based on ultra-thin films of hafnium oxide (HfO2). The team made the HfO2-based memristors measuring just 40x40 nm2, which exhibit propert... » read more

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