Manufacturing Bits: July 26


Jumping films Riken and the University of Tokyo have developed a tiny autonomous actuator. The actuator, which is based on a special material, can automatically curl up or straighten out when exposed to ambient humidity. And in certain conditions, the film can even jump into the air by itself. A video can be seen here. Researchers placed a material called guanidinium carbonate into a hig... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 24


Microbunching EUV Researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have provided a status report on its ongoing efforts to develop a steady-state microbunching (SSMB) technology. SSMB is a technology used within a storage ring, which is a large-scale, circular particle accelerator. An SSMB mechanism produces a high-power radiation source within the ring. This, in turn, could enable a... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 9


3D chip consortium The 3D integration consortium of IRT Nanoelec has a new member--EV Group. Based in Grenoble, France, IRT Nanoelec is an R&D center headed by CEA-Leti. Formed in 2012, the 3D integration consortium is one of IRT’s core programs. EV Group joins Leti, Mentor Graphics, SET and STMicroelectronics as members of the 3D consortium. The program is developing a 3D integration ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Dec. 1


European R&D hub A new European hub for semiconductor R&D is open for business. The hub is part of an EU-funded program called ASCENT or Access to European Nanoelectronics Network. The program is aimed to give researchers access to chip and related technologies within three European R&D organizations--CEA-Leti, Imec and the Tyndall National Institute. As reported, ASCENT was originally f... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 13


Pop-up 3D printing Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new “pop-up” printing technique to make 3D structures down to 100nm. The technique has advantages over today’s 3D printing, which is creating a lot of buzz, if not hype, in the market. Researchers from Northwestern and Illinois devised a printing technique that mimics the act... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 7


Europe’s TFET project A new European project has revealed more details about its plans to develop a next-generation chip technology called tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). EPFL is coordinating this new European research project, dubbed E2SWITCH. The project also includes IBM, Forschungszentrum Jülich, the University of Lund, ETHZ, Imec, CCS, SCIPROM and IUNET. The project has be... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 15


Self-assembled nano-walls Using a self-assembly process, Texas A&M University and the International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research have devised a new technology called “nano-walls.” [caption id="attachment_11488" align="alignnone" width="499"] Researchers use common spray gun to create self-assembling nanoparticle films. (Source: Texas A&M).[/caption] Researcher... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 1


Portable laser weapons For years, the U.S. military has been developing high-energy laser (HEL) weapons. But the massive size, weight and power requirements of laser systems limit their use on many military platforms. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has made a breakthrough in its so-called Excalibur program. The program will develop laser weapons that are 10 times ligh... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 15


Better Beer Rice University has devised a polymer material that could boost the properties of natural gas, beer and soda. By adding modified, single-atom-thick graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) to thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), Rice’s polymer material could make it more practical for vehicles to run on compressed natural gas. The material is far more impermeable to pressurized gas and lighte... » read more