System Bits: Dec. 6


Teaching computers to read A multidisciplinary team of UCLA researchers has built a computational model that reflects how humans think and communicate, by designing an algorithm that examined nearly two million posts from popular parenting websites, thereby teaching computers to understand structured narratives within the flow of posts on the internet. Managing large-scale data in this way ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 8


Scrap metal batteries A research team at Vanderbilt University used scraps of steel and brass - two of the most commonly discarded materials - to create a steel-brass battery that can store energy at levels comparable to lead-acid batteries while charging and discharging at rates comparable to ultra-fast charging supercapacitors. The researchers found that when scraps of steel and brass a... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 25


Scalable quantum computers In what they say is a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer, researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits. The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses 3D based on spring-lo... » read more

Neural Net Computing Explodes


Neural networking with advanced parallel processing is beginning to take root in a number of markets ranging from predicting earthquakes and hurricanes to parsing MRI image datasets in order to identify and classify tumors. As this approach gets implemented in more places, it is being customized and parsed in ways that many experts never envisioned. And it is driving new research into how el... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 13


Big data programming language MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) researchers this week are presenting a new programming language, called Milk, that lets application developers manage memory more efficiently in programs that deal with scattered data points in large data sets. The researchers reminded that in today’s computer chips, memory management is base... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 6


How might AI affect urban life in 2030? In an ongoing project hosted by Stanford University to inform societal deliberation and provide guidance on the ethical development of smart software, sensors and machines, a panel of academic and industrial thinkers has looked ahead to 2030 to forecast how advances in artificial intelligence (AI) might affect life in a typical North American city. Th... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 30


Probing photon-electron interactions According to Rice University researchers, where light and matter intersect, the world illuminates; where they interact so strongly that they become one, they illuminate a world of new physics. Here, the team is closing in on a way to create a new condensed matter state in which all the electrons in a material act as one by manipulating them with light and a... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 16


Safer drinking water Two-dimensional materials are gaining steam in the R&D labs. 2D materials include graphene, boron nitride (BN) and the transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). These materials could one day enable future field-effect transistors (FETs). One TMD, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), is also generating interest in other fields. Molybdenum disulfide consists of two elements--moly... » read more

System Bits: July 19


Using carbon nanotubes to leapfrog today’s silicon chips According to Stanford University’s Subhasish Mitra, associate professor of electrical engineering and of computer science, and H.-S. Philip Wong, professor of electrical engineering, the future of supercomputing might actually be really, really small. With support from the National Science Foundation, the two are working with IBM and... » read more

System Bits: July 5


Computer vision for automated data collection Stanford University researchers have developed a computer vision system that automates the collection of data about the elements in buildings in order to streamline the remodeling or refurbishment of existing buildings, which can be fraught with delays and cost overruns due to hidden problems. Renovation projects live and die by the quality of i... » read more

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