Challenges Grow For IP Reuse


As chip complexity increases, so does the complexity of IP blocks being developed for those designs. That is making it much more difficult to re-use IP from one design to the next, or even to integrate new IP into an SoC. What is changing is the perception that standard [getkc id="43" kc_name="IP"] works the same in every design. Moreover, well-developed [getkc id="100" kc_name="methodologie... » read more

The CEO Outlook Returns


One of the more popular events hosted by the EDA Consortium (EDAC, to those in the know) was the CEO Forecast held at the start of each year. It was phased out several years ago for a number of reasons, including logistics and scheduling. Attendance was never one of them. As I took the reins of EDAC two years ago, I repeatedly heard how much that evening was missed. Members and non-members h... » read more

VCS Fine-Grained Parallelism Simulation Performance Technology


Learn how fine-grained parallelism simulation technology enables delivery of breakthrough parallel simulation performance improvement needed to reduce turn-around time for critical-path tests. » read more

Blog Review: March 22


Cadence's Paul McLellan shares TSMC's plans for 5nm and gate-all-around FET, plus other highlights from last week's Technology Symposium. Mentor's Craig Armenti examines how product development teams can increase efficiency through concurrent schematic design. Synopsys' Jim Ivers warns of the data security and privacy issues posed by a wave of popular connected toys. At Embedded World,... » read more

The Week In Review: Manufacturing


Chipmakers At this week’s TSMC Technology Symposium in San Jose, Calif., TSMC rolled out a dizzying array of new processes and technologies. Perhaps the most surprising announcement was a 22nm bulk CMOS process, which is geared for ultra low-power planar chips. The technology will compete against a 22nm FD-SOI technology from GlobalFoundries. Stay tuned. The battle has just begun. As e... » read more

The Week In Review: Design


Business Andes Technology went public this week on the Taiwan Stock Exchange with an initial stock listing of 40,611,915 shares at a price of NT$65.10 (USD $2.12) per share. The shares began trading March 14, 2017, under the TWSE ticker symbol “6533.TWO.” Andes plans to use the proceeds to expand the company's R&D effort, to fuel international expansion into the U.S. and Europe and t... » read more

Power Impacting Cost Of Chips


The increase in complexity of the power delivery network (PDN) is starting to outpace increases in functional complexity, adding to the already escalating costs of modern chips. With no signs of slowdown, designers have to ensure that overdesign and margining do not eat up all of the profit margin. The semiconductor industry is used to problems becoming harder at smaller geometries, but unti... » read more

Blog Review: March 15


Cadence's Christen Decoin looks back at the changes in design rule checking and asks, with growing design sizes and rule complexity, has DRC run out of steam? Synopsys' Eric Huang provides some background on DisplayPort and its integration with the USB Type-C connector. In his latest video, Mentor's Colin Walls investigates the relationship between the choice of operating system and the p... » read more

The Week In Review: Design


SoftBank plans to sell a 25% stake in ARM to Vision Fund, a $100 billion technology fund created last year by SoftBank and Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund. SoftBank and Saudi Arabia are investing $25 billion and $45 billion in the fund, respectively. Another potential major player is Mubadala Development Co., the government-owned Abu Dhabi investment firm which owns GlobalFoundries and, a... » read more

Antenna Design Grows Up


Apple’s iPhone 4 antenna issue represents a classic example of what can go wrong in modern antenna design. Put one in the wrong place, and a seemingly insignificant part can turn a cool new product into a public relations nightmare. Ever since antennas dropped out of sight, most consumers don't give them a second thought. In the 1960s, almost every home had a rooftop antenna. Fast forward ... » read more

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