The Week In Review: IoT


Analysis Some consumer IoT products are actually useful and helpful in daily life, such as the Nest Learning Thermostat and the Honeywell Lyric for home automation, David Pogue writes. Then there are the products that make most people scratch their heads – IoT water bottles, the IoT toilet-paper dispenser, the IoT toothbrush, IoT umbrella, IoT fork, the IoT egg tray, and so on, he notes. “... » read more

Executive Committee Members You Need To Know…


Time is the only critic without ambition. – John Steinbeck Like many things, DAC looks decidedly different depending on where you sit, and how you experience it. As an attendee, it’s mostly a few days at the start of every summer where you can sample some of the best technical content on the design of circuits and systems, plus get the chance to network and have some fun with a worldwide... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 4


Light deflection through fog In a development that could lead to computer vision systems that work in fog or drizzle, which have been a major obstacle to self-driving cars, MIT researchers have developed a technique for recovering visual information from light that has scattered because of interactions with the environment — such as passing through human tissue. This technology — called... » read more

Joint R&D Has Its Ups And Downs


As corporate spending on research and development dwindles, enterprises are reaching out to colleges and universities to supplement their R&D. And they often are finding eager partners in those endeavors, as professors and their graduate students look for help, financial and technical, in addressing long-term research projects. “Pure research is just a luxury no one can afford anymore,... » read more

System Bits: May 31


In automaton we trust? It is widely believed that there are two kinds of robots: friendly and helpful; or sinister and deadly. But do humans place too much trust in robots? According to the work of Harvard University senior Serena Booth, a computer science concentrator at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the answer is as complex and multifaceted as robots themsel... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 3


DNA thermometers The University of Montreal has taken DNA and built the world’s smallest thermometer. The programmable DNA thermometer is 5nm, or 20,000 times smaller than a human hair. Applications for the technology include cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedicine, nanoelectronics and synthetic biology, according to the University of Montreal. Researchers added optical reporters to D... » read more

System Bits: March 8


Living, breathing supercomputers Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the substance that provides energy to all the cells in the human body, may also be able to power the next generation of supercomputers, according to McGill University researchers. The team has described a model of a biological computer that they have created that is able to process information very quickly and accurately using p... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 12


Coaxing human stem cells to form human organs In a step toward personalized drug testing, MIT researchers have coaxed human stem cells to form complex tissues in a new technique, which also has near-term implications for growing organ-like tissues on a chip and that may ultimately allow personalized organs to be grown for transplant patients. The researchers said growing organs on demand, u... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 15


Building chips skyscraper style With the aim of boosting electronic performance by factor of a thousand, a team of researchers led by Stanford University engineers have created a skyscraper-like chip design, based on materials more advanced than silicon. For many years, computer systems have been designed with processors and memory chips laid out like single-story structures in a suburb whe... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 15


Cache-coherence innovation for thousand-core chips MIT researchers are getting ready to unveil what they say is the first fundamentally new approach to cache coherence in more than three decades. They reminded that in a modern, multicore chip, every processor core has its own small memory cache, where it stores frequently used data. The chip also has a larger, shared cache, which all the cores... » read more

← Older posts