Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 17


Creating magnets with electricity Researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea Institute of Materials Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Max Planck Institute, and the University of New South Wales drew magnetic squares in a nonmagnetic material with an electrified pen and then "read" this magneti... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Dec. 6


Perovskites for data storage Scientists at EPFL developed a new perovskite material whose magnetic order can be rapidly changed without disrupting it due to heating that could potentially be used to build next-generation hard drives. "We have essentially discovered the first magnetic photoconductor," said Bálint Náfrádi, a postdoc at EPFL. This new crystal structure combines the advant... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 10


Non-toxic thin-films A team at Australia's University of New South Wales achieved the world's highest efficiency using flexible solar cells that are non-toxic and cheap to make, with a record 7.6% efficiency in a 1cm2 area thin-film CZTS cell. Unlike its thin-film competitors, CZTS cells are made from abundant materials: copper, zinc, tin and sulphur, and has none of the toxicity problems... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 25


Silicon-based quantum computer coding With the goal of removing lingering doubts quantum computers can become a reality, researchers at the University of New South Wales have proven – with what they say is the highest score ever obtained – that a quantum version of computer code can be written and manipulated using two quantum bits in a silicon microchip, removing any doubt silicon ca... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 3


Quantum computer architecture Providing a blueprint to build the long-awaited, large-scale quantum computer, University of New South Wales (UNSW) and University of Melbourne researchers have designed a 3D silicon chip architecture based on single atom quantum bits that they said is compatible with atomic-scale fabrication techniques. Headquartered at UNSW, researchers from the Australian R... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 13


Quantum computing hurdle cleared Clearing what they say is the final hurdle to making silicon-based quantum computers a reality, a team of University of New South Wales researchers has built a quantum logic gate in silicon for the first time, making calculations between two qubits of information possible. Team leader Andrew Dzurak, Scientia Professor and Director of the Australian National ... » read more