Neural Net Computing Explodes

Neural networking with advanced parallel processing is beginning to take root in a number of markets ranging from predicting earthquakes and hurricanes to parsing MRI image datasets in order to identify and classify tumors. As this approach gets implemented in more places, it is being customized and parsed in ways that many experts never envisioned. And it is driving new research into how el... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 16

Record-breaking quantum logic gate Reaching the benchmark required theoretically to build a quantum computer, University of Oxford researchers have achieved a quantum logic gate with record-breaking 99.9% precision. They reminded that quantum computers, which function according to the laws of quantum physics, have the potential to dwarf the processing power of today's computers, able to pro... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 16

Dissolving batteries Researchers at Iowa State University developed a self-destructing lithium-ion battery capable of delivering 2.5 volts and dissolving or dissipating in 30 minutes when dropped in water. The battery can power a desktop calculator for about 15 minutes. Making such devices possible is the goal of a relatively new field of study called "transient electronics." These transi... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 5

Faster quantum dot entanglement Due to entanglement between distant quantum objects being an important ingredient for future information technologies, ETH Zurich researchers have developed a method with which such states can be created a thousand times faster than before. [caption id="attachment_24629" align="alignright" width="300"] In two entangled quantum objects the spins are in a super... » read more

Two Constraints-Based Techniques To Address Power-Related Challenges In SoC Design

Power scheduling, power integrity targets, voltage drop—these are just a few of the power-related challenges you’re no doubt managing in your SoC designs. There aren’t any easy answers, but there are some emerging—and promising—techniques. Two such techniques, according to University of Toronto Professor Farid Najm, are constraints generation and constraints-based verification. “... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 21

Hybrid crystals for efficient LEDs A team from the University of Toronto combined two promising solar cell materials together for the first time, creating a new platform for LED technology. The team designed a way to embed strongly luminescent nanoparticles called colloidal quantum dots into perovskite. Perovskites are a family of materials that can be easily manufactured from solution, a... » read more

New Approaches To Imaging For Both Large And Small

Imaging is the common theme for everything at Photonics West this year, and two new ideas caught my attention—a near field very small microscope and a new way of collecting images that separates reflected light from indirect light. IMEC has presented papers about its near field microscope before. This year the research house has reduced it to a product. The idea is to illuminate a object w... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Dec. 8

Light in lieu of wires In a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics rather than electricity to carry data, Stanford engineers have designed and built a prism-like device they call an ‘optical link’ that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles. The optical link is a tiny slice of silicon etched with a pattern that res... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 10

Cheaper, lighter solar cells Think those flat, glassy solar panels on your neighbor’s roof are the best solar technology has to offer? Not so. Engineers in the University of Toronto’s Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering have designed and tested a new class of solar-sensitive nanoparticle that they say outperforms the current state of the art. Based on a new form of solid... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: March 25

Making flexible carbon nanotube circuits more reliable and efficient Engineers would love to create flexible electronic devices, such as e-readers that could be folded to fit into a pocket with one such approach involving designing circuits based on electronic fibers known as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) instead of rigid silicon chips -- but reliability is essential. Given that most silicon chip... » read more

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