System Bits: Jan. 14


Integrated photonics platform Researchers at Harvard’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences came up with an integrated photonics platform capable of storing light and electrically controlling its frequency or color through a microchip. Mian Zhang, first author of the resulting paper, says, “Many quantum photonic and classical optics applications require shifting of op... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 8


Measure twice, cut once University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researchers are working with a robotic device that can perform laparoscopic surgery through a single incision, an operation that typically requires five or six small incisions. The device is called the SP Robot, developed by Intuitive Surgical. It features four arms that go into the body through a 1-inch incision. UT South... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 2


Princeton plumbs blockchain technology Researchers at Princeton University’s School of Engineering and Applied Science are looking at how blockchain technology can provide secure financial transactions, among other applications. “Early on we realized this was a technology that was not well understood but that a lot of people were interested in,” says Ed Felten, the Robert E. Kahn Profess... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 26


Adding learning to computer vision UCLA’s Samueli School of Engineering and Stanford University are working on advanced computer vision technology, using artificial intelligence to help vision systems learn to identify faces, objects and other things on their own, without training by humans. The research team breaks up images into chunks they call “viewlets,” then they have the computer ... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 18


AI studies at Stanford Language processing is a leading area in artificial intelligence research, Stanford University reports. “We’re trying to inform the conversation about artificial intelligence with hard data,” says Yoav Shoham, professor of computer science, emeritus, adding, “Language is the ultimate frontier of AI research because you can express any thought or idea in langua... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 11


Calculating the costs of autonomous vehicles The development of autonomous vehicle technology commands a lot of media coverage. Little reporting has been devoted to the costs of operating AVs, a subject that developers don’t discuss in general. The Houston-Galveston Area Council’s website recently divulged contract figures with two startups, Drive.ai and EasyMile. For Silicon Valley-bas... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 4


High precision system for self-driving car navigation Based on technology developed by ETH Zurich researchers, Fixposition is a spin-off specializing in real-time navigation systems for use in self-driving vehicles, robots or industrial drones, which uses a combination of satellite-based positioning systems such as GPS with computer vision technologies to achieve an unparalleled degree of prec... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 27


Silent, lightweight aircraft powered by ionic wind Instead of propellers or turbines, MIT researchers have built and flown the first-ever aircraft with no moving parts that is powered by an “ionic wind” — a silent but mighty flow of ions that is produced aboard the plane, and that generates enough thrust to propel the plane over a sustained, steady flight. [caption id="attachment_2414... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 20


Designing transistors that don’t overheat In order to avoid heat-induced voids and cracking that can cause chips and circuits to fail, Stanford University and University of California at Davis researchers have developed a way to not only manage heat, but help route it away from delicate devices that leverages a thermal transistor, which is a nanoscale switch that can conduct heat away from ... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 13


Deep learning device identifies airborne allergens To identify and measure airborne biological particles, or bioaerosols, that originate from living organisms such as plants or fungi, UCLA researchers have invented a portable device that uses holograms and machine learning. The device is trained to recognize five common allergens — pollen from Bermuda grass, oak, ragweed and spores from t... » read more

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