5 Steps To Data-Driven Manufacturing


There is a lot of hype surrounding “Industry 4.0,” “Smart Manufacturing,” “the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT),” and other associated terms, but it all boils down to one question: How do I become a data-driven manufacturer? Companies strive to be data driven, realizing that decisions will be more objective and more likely to achieve the desired results. In fact, many compani... » read more

Manufacturing ADAS Cameras Calls For Analytics


Automotive camera design and manufacturing is one of the most difficult undertakings in hardware. Not only do you need to deal with the usual difficulties of high performance mechanical and electrical designs, but now highly specialized and sensitive optics are added into the equation. Complicating factors is that you won’t know how good the product is until it’s been completely assembled, ... » read more

Thinking Differently About IIoT Analytics


Manufacturers are rushing to keep up with the latest technology trends and perhaps the most significant ones are around the smart factory. Whether you call it Industry 4.0, Smart Manufacturing or the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), what all these initiatives have in common is the desire to maximize value from manufacturing data and improve overall manufacturing efficiency. With the ave... » read more

Data Sharing And Digital Threads


Electronics and the components that power them are more complex and advanced than ever. With these products an integral part of our daily lives, their reliability has become nothing less than mission-critical. As the demand for components accelerates, it is important that quality is not compromised under the pressure to meet quantity requirements. Otherwise we’re going to be seeing a lot of r... » read more

The 3 Main Obstacles To Zero DPPM And How To Overcome Them


As we all well know, there are multiple mission critical applications in today’s “Age of Smart” that are calling for zero DPPM (defective parts per million) in semiconductors and electronic systems. In industries such as automotive, medical, aerospace, and more, where lives are at stake, defective parts are not an option. The quality imperative However, with the ever-growing complexi... » read more

Using Data Analytics More Effectively


The semiconductor industry is under a lot of pressure from their customers nowadays. They’re expected to keep up with consumer expectations for shorter electronic product life cycles, without compromising on the reliability and quality of the components and products coming off the line. A recent article from McKinsey & Company, however, describes how quality procedures have become a bottl... » read more

Is It Safe To Assume That All “Passed” Die Are Actually “Good” Die?


In a world where Quality and Brand Protection is King, as certainly is the case for the automotive and medical device industries where strict minimal DPPM (defective parts per million) requirements are a common constraint, new methods for “escape” prevention and outlier detection are constantly being evaluated and implemented by semiconductor vendors to prevent any defective or marginal par... » read more

Are All Known Good Tested Devices Created Equal?


Your known good parts all had passed their required wafer sort, final test, and system-level tests and were shipped to your customers. However, as we all know, a known good part or device sometimes does not stay good and may end up failing prematurely in the field and flagged as an RMA (return material authorization) by your customer. But why is it that some good parts fail early and others las... » read more

A More Efficient Way To Calculate Device Specs Of Thousands Of Tests For Improved Quality And Yield


Today’s devices are required to pass thousands of parametric tests prior to being shipped to customers. A key challenge test engineers face, in addition to optimizing the number of tests they run on the device, is how to quickly and accurately define the true specification limits that should be used to determine if the device is “good”. Device specification limits that are too wide may... » read more

Finally, Realizing The Full Benefits Of Parallel Site-To-Site (S2S) Testing


A very common and well-known practice by manufacturers during the IC test process is to test as many of the device die or packaged parts as possible in parallel (i.e. sites) during wafer sort and final test in order to increase test time efficiency and lower overall test costs. The constraints that typically restrict how many test sites can be used at any given time are the design I/O and capac... » read more

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