Who’s Responsible For Security Breaches?


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss industry attitudes towards safety and security with Dave Kelf, chief marketing officer for Breker Verification; Jacob Wiltgen, solutions architect for functional safety at Mentor, a Siemens Business; David Landoll, solutions architect for OneSpin Solutions; Dennis Ciplickas, vice president of characterization solutions at PDF Solutions; Andrew Dauma... » read more

Factoring Reliability Into Chip Manufacturing


Making chips that can last two decades is possible, even if it's developed at advanced process nodes and is subject to extreme environmental conditions, such as under the hood of a car or on top of a light pole. But doing that at the same price point as chips that go into consumer electronics, which are designed to last two to four years, is a massively complex challenge. Until a couple of y... » read more

Automotive Semiconductors Boost MCU, Analog Markets


Auto sales are expected to experience a slowdown in 2019, and even with the continued increase in electronics per vehicle, automotive semiconductor sales are also expected to experience a slowdown. Similar to prior years, 2019/2020 car models will include more automotive semiconductor devices to provide higher degrees of safety, comfort and convenience, driver assist capabilities, in-cabin ente... » read more

Power, Reliability And Security In Packaging


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss advanced packaging with Ajay Lalwani, vice president of global manufacturing operations at eSilicon; Vic Kulkarni, vice president and chief strategist in the office of the CTO at ANSYS; Calvin Cheung, vice president of engineering at ASE; Walter Ng, vice president of business management at UMC; and Tien Shiah, senior manager for memory at Samsun... » read more

Circuit Aging Becoming A Critical Consideration


Circuit aging was considered somebody else's problem when most designs were for chips in consumer applications, but not anymore. Much of this reflects a shift in markets. When most chips were designed for consumer electronics, such as smart phones, designs typically were replaced every couple of years. But with the mobile phone market flattening, and as chips increasingly are used in automot... » read more

BiST Grows Up In Automotive


Test concepts and methods that have been used for many years in traditional semiconductor and SoC design are now being leveraged for automotive chips, but they need to be adapted and upgraded to enable monitoring of advanced automotive systems during operation of a vehicle. Automotive and safety critical designs have very high quality, reliability, and safety requirements, which pairs pe... » read more

Test Moving Forward And Backward


Test, once considered an important but rather mundane way of separating good chips from the not-so-good and the total rejects, is taking on a whole new life. After decades of largely living in the shadows behind design and advancements in materials and lithography, test has quietly shifted into a much more critical and more public role. But it has taken several rather significant shifts acro... » read more

The 3 Big Data Mega Trends For Manufacturing


By Michael Schuldenfrei In today’s global, highly competitive economy, industrial companies are under intense pressure to lower manufacturing costs and streamline processes without compromising quality. Production managers are expected to contribute to improved business outcomes through ultra-efficient use of raw materials, near-zero production downtime, streamlined labor costs, and agile wo... » read more

5G Design Changes


Mike Fitton, senior director of strategic planning at Achronix, talks with Semiconductor Engineering about the two distinct parts of 5G deployment, how to get a huge amount of data from the core to the edge of a device where it is usable, and how a network on chip can improve the flow of data. » read more

In Automotive, A Move From Microcontrollers To Massively Complex SoCs


Cars and custom, high-end chips. It’s a topic coming up more frequently these days. The most prominent example is Tesla’s FSD computer, described by Elon Musk as “the best chip in the world…objectively” during the company’s April Autonomy Day. When it comes to chips, Tesla is alone only when it comes to hyperbole, at least based on browsing job postings for big carmakers and supplie... » read more

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