Week In Review: Design, Low Power


Tools & IP Synopsys debuted its new DesignWare ARC EV7x Embedded Vision Processor family for machine learning and AI edge applications. The ARC EV7x Vision Processors integrate up to four enhanced vector processing units (VPUs) and an optional Deep Neural Network (DNN) accelerator with up to 14,080 MACs to deliver up to 35 TOPS performance in 16nm FinFET process technologies under typical ... » read more

Week in Review – IoT, Security, Autos


Products/Services Synopsys had a lot of announcements this week! Summer is definitely over. The company released BSIMM10 study, the latest version of the Building Security in Maturity Model, helping organizations plan, execute, mature, and measure their software security initiatives. It also released LucidShape version 2019.09, the latest version of that tool for the design, simulation, and an... » read more

Blog Review: Sept. 18


Cadence's Paul McLellan checks out MLPerf and the challenges involved in developing a benchmark to assess machine learning training and inference performance. Synopsys' Om Prakash Thakur and Nusrat Ali take a look at the different types of NVDIMM and how it can bridge the performance gap between memory and storage solutions in servers. Mentor's Matthew Ballance points to why adoption of P... » read more

FPGA Design Tradeoffs Getting Tougher


FPGAs are getting larger, more complex, and significantly harder to verify and debug. In the past, FPGAs were considered a relatively quick and simple way to get to market before committing to the cost and time of developing an ASIC. But today, both FPGAs and eFPGAs are being used in the most demanding applications, including cloud computing, AI, machine learning, and deep learning. In some ... » read more

The New CXL Standard


Gary Ruggles, senior staff product marketing manager at Synopsys, digs into the new Compute Express Link standard, why it’s important for high bandwidth in AI/ML applications, where it came from, and how to apply it in current and future designs. » read more

Week in Review – IoT, Security, Autos


Products/Services Arm and Swift Navigation will collaborate on providing technology to developers of autonomous vehicles and connected cars. San Francisco-based Swift Navigation, which offers Global Navigation Satellite System positioning technology for AVs, is teaming with the chip design company to offer Swift’s solutions as an option on Arm-based platforms, the companies say. Swift’s St... » read more

Week In Review: Design, Low Power


M&A ANSYS will acquire Livermore Software Technology Corp. (LSTC), a provider of explicit dynamics and other advanced finite element analysis technology. Based in Livermore, CA, LSTC was founded in 1987 to commercialize the DYNA3D technology developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. DYNA3D became the company's premier product LS-DYNA, a general purpose nonlinear finite eleme... » read more

3D Power Delivery


Getting power into and around a chip is becoming a lot more difficult due to increasing power density, but 2.5D and 3D integration are pushing those problems to whole new levels. The problems may even be worse with new packaging approaches, such as chiplets, because they constrain how problems can be analyzed and solved. Add to that list issues around new fabrication technologies and an emph... » read more

Trading Off Power And Performance Earlier In Designs


Optimizing performance, power and reliability in consumer electronics is an engineering feat that involves a series of tradeoffs based on gathering as much data about the use cases in which a design will operate. Approaches vary widely by market, by domain expertise, and by the established methodologies and perspective of the design teams. As a result, one team may opt for a leading-edge des... » read more

Machine Learning Inferencing At The Edge


Ian Bratt, fellow in Arm's machine learning group, talks about why machine learning inferencing at the edge is so difficult, what are the tradeoffs, how to optimize data movement, how to accelerate that movement, and how it differs from developing other types of processors. » read more

← Older posts