The Week In Review: Design


IP Synopsys unveiled High Bandwidth Memory 2 (HBM2) IP. The package includes PHY, controller and verification IP and supports data rates up to 2400Mb/s, 20% faster than the JEDEC standard specification. The controller supports pseudo-channel operation in either lock step or memory interleaved mode, and the PHY offers four trained power management states and fast frequency switching. Cadence... » read more

Emulating Systems Of Systems


System design is all the craze these days. I have been in notably more discussions recently about how one can verify systems of systems. Does an airplane or a car lend itself to an array of emulators? Are multiple abstractions needed? How can design teams span electrical, mechanical, and thermal—as well as analog and digital—effects? Do companies need to re-organize to deal with system desi... » read more

How Much Verification Is Necessary?


Since the advent of IC design flows, starting with RTL descriptions in languages like Verilog or VHDL, project teams have struggled with how much verification can and should be performed by the original RTL developers. Constrained-random methods based on high-level languages such as [gettech id="31021" t_name="e"] or [gettech id="31023" comment="SystemVerilog"] further cemented the role of t... » read more

Blog Review: July 26


Mentor's Dan Driscoll digs into designing for safety and security on the Xilinx UltraScale+ MPSoC and the different mechanisms that support subsystem isolation. Cadence's Paul McLellan listens in on a talk by Bosch's Volkmar Denner on the future of communications and AI in connected autos. Synopsys' Robert Vamosi points to a recently-discovered vulnerability that could be present in thous... » read more

The Week In Review: Design


Tools Mentor released the latest version of its FloTHERM CFD software for electronics cooling simulation, adding a new design window to create and solve variants of a model with features to improve scenario definition and design space exploration. Other enhancements include support for Phase Change Materials, more abilities for PCB designs, and an improved parallel solver. Markets IC Insig... » read more

Is 7nm The Last Major Node?


A growing number of design and manufacturing issues are prompting questions about what scaling will really look like beyond 10/7nm, how many companies will be involved, and which markets they will address. At the very least, node migrations will go horizontally before proceeding numerically. There are expected to be more significant improvements at 7nm than at any previous node, so rather th... » read more

The Future Of MEMS Design: Making MEMS Design More Like CMOS Design


MEMS-based component suppliers want to rapidly ramp their designs into high-volume production. This demand is driving MEMS suppliers to focus on ways to more efficiently re-use established process steps, stacks or technology platforms. To meet this need, we see the emergence of standard MEMS technology and design platforms similar to those used in CMOS design. The semiconductor industry and ... » read more

Blog Review: July 19


Synopsys' Prishkrit Abrol provides a detailed explanation of how the USB Type-C connector works. Mentor's Ricardo Anguiano examines how the RISC-V ecosystem is expanding and latest developments in the open source toolchain. Cadence's Gopi Krishnamurthy explains the lane margining requirements of the PCIe 4.0 specification. ARM's Chet Babla unravels some claims about Narrowband IoT, Cat... » read more

Hybrid Emulation


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss the growing usage of hybrid verification approaches with Frank Schirrmeister, senior group director of product management & marketing for [getentity id="22032" e_name="Cadence"]; Russ Klein, program director for pre-silicon debug products at [getentity id="22017" e_name="Mentor, a Siemens Business"]; [getperson id="11027" comment="Phil Moorby"],... » read more

What Does An IoT Chip Look Like?


By Ed Sperling and Jeff Dorsch Internet of Things chip design sounds like a simple topic on the face of it. Look deeper, though, and it becomes clear there is no single IoT, and certainly no type of chip that will work across the ever-expanding number of applications and markets that collectively make up the IoT. Included under this umbrella term are sensors, various types of processors, ... » read more

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