System Bits: Aug. 22


Bioimaging technique tracks multiple in vivo interactions To make it possible to quickly and economically monitor multiple molecular interactions in a large area of living tissue – such as an organ or a small animal — Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute researchers have created an approach to optical imaging that could have applications in medical diagnosis, guided surgery, or pre-clinical dr... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 8


Improving robot vision, virtual reality, self-driving cars In order to generate information-rich images and video frames that will enable robots to better navigate the world and understand certain aspects of their environment, such as object distance and surface texture, engineers at Stanford University and the University of California San Diego have developed a camera that generates 4D images... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 25


Metrology for the intelligence community The semiconductor industry continues to move full speed ahead with traditional chip scaling. There are several challenges in the arena. One of the big but lessor known challenges is metrology. Metrology, the science of characterizing and measuring films and structures, is becoming more complex, challenging and expensive at each node. Looking to solv... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 25


Sodium-ion cathode Researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas and Seoul National University developed a manganese and sodium-ion-based cathode material they hope could lead to lower-cost rechargeable batteries. In a typical lithium-ion battery, the cathode is made of lithium, cobalt, nickel and oxygen. "Lithium is a more expensive, limited resource that must be mined from just a fe... » read more

System Bits: July 18


Melanoma predicted from images with a high degree of accuracy by neural network model The poke and punch of traditional melanoma biopsies could be avoided in the near future, thanks to work by UC Santa Barbara researchers. UCSB undergrad Abhishek Bhattacharya is using the power of artificial intelligence to help people ascertain whether that new and strange mark is, in fact, the deadly skin... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 18


Ad hoc "cache hierarchies" Researchers at MIT and Carnegie Mellon University designed a system that reallocates cache access on the fly, to create new "cache hierarchies" tailored to the needs of particular programs. Dubbed Jenga, the system distinguishes between the physical locations of the separate memory banks that make up the shared cache. For each core, Jenga knows how long it would t... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 11


3D chip integrates computing, storage Researchers at Stanford University and MIT developed a prototype 3D chip that integrates computation and data storage, based on carbon nanotubes and resistive RAM (RRAM) cells. The researchers integrated over 1 million RRAM cells and 2 million carbon nanotube FETs, making what the team says is the most complex nanoelectronic system ever made with emergi... » read more

System enables large speedups — as much as 88-fold — on common parallel-computing algorithms (MIT)


Source: MIT/ CSAIL: Suvinay Subramanian, Mark C. Jeffrey, Maleen Abeydeera, Hyun Ryong Lee, Victor A. Ying, Joel Emer, Daniel Sanchez As is commonly known, the chips in most modern desktop computers have four cores or processing units, which can run different computational tasks in parallel, but that the chips of the future could have dozens or even hundreds of cores, and taking advantage o... » read more

Ignoring Anomalies


Everyone has been in this situation at some point in their career—you have a data point that is so far out of the ordinary that you dismiss it as erroneous. You blame the test equipment, or the fact that it is Friday afternoon and happy hour started 10 minutes ago. In most cases it may never happen again and nobody will ever notice that you quietly swept it under the rug. But in doing so, ... » read more

System Bits: July 3


VW emissions tests cheat code found A team of researchers from UC San Diego, Ruhr University along with an independent researcher has uncovered the mechanism that Volkswagen used to circumvent U.S. and European emission tests over a period of at least six years before the EPA put the company on notice in 2015 for violating the Clean Air Act. The researchers found the code that allowed onboa... » read more

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