Five DAC Keynotes


The ending of Moore's Law may be about to create a new golden age for design, especially one fueled by artificial intelligence and machine learning. But design will become task-, application- and domain-specific, and will require that we think about the lifecycle of the products in a different way. In the future, we also will have to design for augmentation of experience, not just automation... » read more

System Bits: July 16


Test tube AI neural network In a significant step towards demonstrating the capacity to program artificial intelligence into synthetic biomolecular circuits, Caltech researchers have developed an artificial neural network made out of DNA that can solve a classic machine learning problem: correctly identifying handwritten numbers. The work was done in the laboratory of Lulu Qian, assistant p... » read more

System Bits: July 10


Foldable electronic switches and sensors Using inexpensive materials, UC Berkeley engineers have created a method to fabricate foldable electronic switches and sensors directly onto paper, along with prototype generators, supercapacitors and other electronic devices for what they said is a range of applications. Besides the fact that it is readily available and low cost, the team pointed ou... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 19


Tandem solar reaches 25.2% efficiency In the push for ever-more efficient solar panels, researchers are turning to tandem, or double-junction, photovoltaics. Tandem solar panels use two different types of solar cell capable of absorbing different wavelengths of light stacked on top of each other to maximize the conversion of light rays into electrical power. Recently, two groups have reache... » read more

System Bits: June 19


ML algorithm 3D scan comparison up to 1,000 times faster To address the issue of medical image registration that typically takes two hours or more to meticulously align each of potentially a million pixels in the combined scans, MIT researchers have created a machine-learning algorithm they say can register brain scans and other 3D images more than 1,000 times more quickly using novel learning... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: June 12


Elastic diamonds A group has developed a way to make elastic diamonds, enabling tiny diamond needles that can flex and stretch. Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the City University of Hong Kong and Nanyang Technological University have developed a process that enables elastic diamonds. Elastic diamonds could one day... » read more

System Bits: June 12


Writing complex ML/DL analytics algorithms Rice University researchers in the DARPA-funded Pliny Project believe they have the answer for every stressed-out systems programmer who has struggled to implement complex objects and workflows on ‘big data’ platforms like Spark and thought: “Isn’t there a better way?” Their answer: Yes with PlinyCompute, which the team describes as “a sys... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 29


Utilizing Heat For Energy One of the big problems in electronics in general, and semiconductors particular, is heat. And it's not just about leakage current anymore. Heat is a problem at every level, from circuit design to the materials being used inside the chips, as well as warpage between die caused by heat after they are packaged together. Heat can prematurely age chips as well as destroy ... » read more

System Bits: May 29


Ultra-low-power sensors carrying genetically engineered bacteria to detect gastric bleeding In order to diagnose bleeding in the stomach or other gastrointestinal problems, MIT researchers have built an ingestible sensor equipped with genetically engineered bacteria. [caption id="attachment_24134598" align="alignleft" width="300"] MIT engineers have designed an ingestible sensor equipped with... » read more

System Bits: May 22


AI disruptions and benefits in the workplace According to Stanford University researchers, artificial intelligence offers both promise and peril as it revolutionizes the workplace, the economy and personal lives. Visiting scholar James Timbie of the Hoover Institution, who studies artificial intelligence and other technologies, said that in the workplace of tomorrow, many routine jobs now p... » read more

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