System Bits: Aug. 7


ML leverages existing hospital patient data to detect trouble Focusing on emergency and critical care patients, a University of Michigan spinout, Fifth Eye, has developed a system that combines a machine learning algorithm with signal processing to monitor the autonomic nervous system of hospital patients and interprets the data every two minutes, which can sometimes be almost two days faster ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 16


Levitating metrology The Instituto de Ciencias Físicas UNAM has developed a new contaminant detection technique. It uses sound waves to levitate droplets of water for sampling purposes. Researchers use a technique called laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The technique analyzes heavy metals in levitating drops of water, according to The Optical Society (OSA) journal Optics Letter... » read more

Blazing-Fast Performance


When it comes to raw performance, there's nothing like a supercomputer. Until recently, though, most of this was simply bragging rights about whose supercomputer was faster. A trillion calculations (petaflop), more or less, doesn't mean that much outside of scientific circles. What's changing is that companies and governments now can utilize these blazing fast machines across a wider swath o... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 3


World's brightest accelerator Japan’s High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is readying what is considered the world’s most luminous or brightest particle accelerator. The system, dubbed the SuperKEKB, combines an electron-positron collider with a new and advanced detector. The storage ring system is designed to explore and measure rare decays of elementary particles, such... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 2


World’s coldest chip Using a network of nuclear refrigerators, the University of Basel and others claim to have set the record for the world’s coldest chip. Researchers have cooled a chip to a temperature lower than 3 millikelvin. A millikelvin is one thousandth of a kelvin. Absolute zero is 0 kelvin or minus 273.15 °C. In the experiment, researchers used a chip that includes a Coulomb... » read more

The Week In Review: IoT


M&A TDK has agreed to acquire InvenSense for $13 a share, representing a total of $1.3 billion in cash. The transaction must be approved by InvenSense shareholders and regulatory agencies; TDK expects to wrap up the deal in the second quarter of its fiscal year ending in March of 2018 (the third quarter of the calendar year). Apple accounted for 40% of InvenSense’s revenue for the fiscal... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: June 21


Atomic sculpting Oak Ridge National Laboratory has combined a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with new electronic controls. This tool enables the construction, or the atomic sculpting, of 3D-like feature sizes down to 1nm and 2nm. To achieve these dimensions, the STEM is controlled with a special set of programmable electronics. This, in turn, enables the STEM to tunnel in... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 10


Diamond polarimeters The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has achieved what it says are the highest precision measurements of polarization in an atom smasher. The measurements were conducted with an instrument called a Hall C Compton Polarimeter. The polarimeter makes use of electron-photon scattering techniques and diamond-based microstrip detectors. The g... » read more

Searching For The Next Power Transistor


For decades, the industry has relied on various power semiconductors to control and convert electrical power in an efficient manner. Power semis are ubiquitous, as they are found in adapters, appliances, cars, elevators, switching power supplies, power grids and other systems. But today’s silicon-based power semiconductor transistor technologies, such as IGBTs, MOSFETs and thyristors, are ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 29


Cool Magnets MIT researchers believe that magnets on the outside of the refrigerator may someday be used for cooling. Magnons, which are essentially a collective spin wave or quasi-particle, are also conductors of heat. MIT researchers found that when exposed to a magnetic field gradient, magnons can be driven from one end of a magnet to another, carrying heat with them. “You can p... » read more

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