Making Everything Linux-Capable


It's not clear how the edge will play out or what will be the winning formula from a hardware standpoint. But for everything beyond the end device, and possibly even including the end device, a key prerequisite will be the ability to run Linux. That means at least one processor or core within the hardware will need to run 64-bit software. In addition, systems will need to have enough storage... » read more

Better Security, Lower Cost


For years, chipmakers have marginalized security in chips, relying instead on software solutions. Eventually that approach caught up with them, creating near panic in a scramble to plug weaknesses involving speculative execution and branch prediction, as well as the ability to read the data from chips with commercially available tools such as optical probes. There were several reasons for th... » read more

Designing The Next Big Things


The edge is a humongous opportunity for the semiconductor industry. The problem, despite its name, is that it's not a single thing. It will be comprised of thousands of different chips and systems, and very few will be sold in large volumes. The edge is the culmination of decades of improvement in power and performance, coupled with the architectural creativity that has exploded since the bene... » read more

The Great Auto Race Goes Internal


Carmakers have discovered a new competitive threat, and it's coming from within their own supply chain. In the past, OEMs leveraged their suppliers to compete against other OEMs, often tapping the same Tier 1 players as their competitors because there was enough differentiation in acceleration time, braking distance, cabin amenities and price to create distinctive brands. Porsche is known fo... » read more

Lane Departure Warnings For The Auto Industry


The automotive chip market is undergoing a series of subtle but significant shifts behind the scenes that could have major implications for the global automotive supply chain. After a few years of racing toward autonomous vehicles and setting in motion a frenzy of activity, some of the big auto makers have begun taking the design of key functions such as centralized logic in-house. There... » read more

An Industry Under Siege


The coronavirus is taking a big toll on the semiconductor industry's unquenchable thirst for new information. The longer it lasts, the more the industry will have to resort to technology — some new, some old — to continue moving forward. Over the past couple weeks, conferences and trade shows have been postponed or outright canceled. Synopsys, Cadence and Intel pulled out of DVCon at the... » read more

Millimeter Wave: A Bridge Too Far?


5G is here. It already is available in new mobile phones, and the infrastructure for extremely fast cellular communication is being built out at a rapid pace. The big question now is which parts of this technology will be successful, and there still is no consistency in those predictions. 5G comes in two flavors, sub-6 GHz and millimeter wave, and the sub-6 GHz version offers immediate perfo... » read more

The Evolution Of Pervasive Computing


The computing world has gone full circle toward pervasive computing. In fact, it has done so more than once, which from the outside may look like a more rapid spin cycle than a real change of direction. Dig deeper, though, and it's apparent that some fundamental changes are at work. This genesis of pervasive computing dates back to the introduction of the PC in 1981, prior to which all corpo... » read more

Preparing For The Great Auto War


The internal combustion engine's days are numbered, and what comes next is going to cause one of the biggest upheavals in the history of business. Before semiconductors and electronics, it was the auto industry that defined economies of scale. In fact, the auto industry became the model on which the entire electronics industry was built. It always was assumed that the mainframe, minicomputer... » read more

The Last Mile


The race to autonomous driving is looking a lot less like a race these days. German automakers pushed the likely date for Level 5 autonomous driving back to 2032 from 2027, according to attendees at the International Congress for Automotive Electronics (ELIV) in Bonn last month. There are a number of reasons for this. The first is cost. The amount of processing needed to make the split-secon... » read more

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