Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 16


World’s fastest camera The Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) in Canada has developed what researchers say is the world’s fastest camera. The camera, called T-CUP, is capable of capturing ten trillion frames per second. It’s possible to nearly freeze time to see various phenomena in the system. In a system, the technology can be used to take high-speed images of sam... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 3


X-ray holography Using a technique called X-ray holography, a group of researchers have uncovered the phase transitions of vanadium dioxide. X-ray holography is a promising high-resolution metrology technique. Vanadium dioxide is one of many materials that can exhibit metal or insulator properties depending on the temperature. Vanadium dioxide can switch from an insulating to a metallic pha... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 13


Watching nanowires grow Using X-ray techniques, the University of Siegen and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have observed the formation of tiny nanowires in gallium arsenide (GaAs) materials in real time. GaAs is used for fiber optics, infrared systems, RF devices in mobile phones and solar panels in spacecraft. Observing the growth of GaAs nanowires could lead to a better unde... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 5


Laser-magnet metrology The FELIX Laboratory and the High Field Magnet Laboratory (HFML) have recently conducted the first measurements that combine a free electron laser (FEL) with a powerful magnet. The combination enables researchers to explore the electronic properties of materials. It provides a way to perform terahertz (THz) magneto spectroscopy on samples. The FELIX Laboratory at R... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 11


China’s storage ring for EUV A group of researchers are banding together to propel the development of a storage ring technology that may one day be used as a power source for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The collaboration includes five institutions. Researchers have organized an informal collaboration or study group with plans to develop a storage ring for EUV based on a techno... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 30


Looking for heavy photons The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and others have embarked on a mission to find hypothetical particles called heavy photons. In 2015, researchers from the so-called Heavy Photon Search (HPS) group started the experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Researchers installed a particle detector half a millim... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 18


Measuring gooey materials The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Thermo Fisher Scientific have devised an instrument that correlates the flow properties of “soft gooey” materials, such as gels, molten polymers and biological fluids. The instrument, called a rheo-Raman microscope, combines three instruments into one system. First, the system incorporates a Raman sp... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 24


Microbunching EUV Researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have provided a status report on its ongoing efforts to develop a steady-state microbunching (SSMB) technology. SSMB is a technology used within a storage ring, which is a large-scale, circular particle accelerator. An SSMB mechanism produces a high-power radiation source within the ring. This, in turn, could enable a... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 13


Exploring plasmas with lasers The Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has upgraded its high-power laser system to 200 terawatts of power, roughly 100 times the world’s total power consumption compressed into tens of femtoseconds. The peak power before the upgrade was 30 terawatts. The upgraded laser will be coupled with SLAC's X-ray laser, dubbed the Linac Cohere... » read more