Taking Self-Driving Safety Standards Beyond ISO 26262


I participated in a couple of sessions at Arm TechCon this year, the first on how safety is evolving for platform-based architectures with a mix of safety-aware IP and the second on lessons learned in safety and particularly how the industry and standards are adapting to the larger challenges in self-driving, which obviously extend beyond the pure functional safety intent of ISO 26262. Here I w... » read more

Functional Safety Verification For AV SoC Designs Accelerated With Advanced Tools


Autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be the culmination of dozens of highly complex systems, incorporating state-of-the-art technologies in electronics hardware, sensors, software, and more. Conceiving and designing these systems is certain to be one of the greatest challenges for today’s engineers. The only greater challenge will be convincing a wary public that these automated systems are safer d... » read more

Ensuring Functional Safety For Self-Driving Cars


There may be no hotter topic in electronics than chips for autonomous vehicles. Self-driving cars have captured the public imagination and become a major area of investment. Both established automotive manufacturers and well-funded startups are producing vehicles with the highly complex chips needed to negotiate roads, deal with unpredictable humans and communicate with the cloud for machine le... » read more

Accelerating ISO 26262 Compliance For Semiconductor Projects


In recent years, autonomous driving vehicles have become one of the hottest topics in the automotive world. Everyday consumers and electronics professionals are both fascinated by the promise and the risks of autonomous vehicles. Existing automotive semiconductor companies as well as new entrants are making significant investments in this area developing new high performance, feature rich and p... » read more

ISO 26262:2018 Fault Analysis In Safety Mechanisms


Authors: Jörg Grosse1, Mark Hampton1, Sergio Marchese1, Jörg Koch2, Neil Rattray1, Alin Zagardan2 1OneSpin Solutions, Munich, Germany 2Renesas Electronics Europe, Duesseldorf, Germany ISO 26262-5 requires the determination of hardware safety metrics, including SPFM and LFM. Latent and residual diagnostic coverage are also important metrics to assess the effectiveness of safety mechanisms... » read more

Safety Islands In Safety-Critical Hardware


Safety and security have certain aspects in common so it shouldn’t be surprising that some ideas evolving in one domain find echoes in the other. In hardware design, a significant trend has been to push security-critical functions into a hardware root-of-trust (HRoT) core, following a philosophy of putting all (or most) of those functions in one basket and watching that basket very carefully.... » read more

Planning For Failures In Automotive


The automotive industry is undergoing some fundamental shifts as it backs away from the traditional siloed approach to one of graceful failure, slowing the evolution to fully autonomy and rethinking how to achieve its goals for a reasonable cost. For traditional automakers, this means borrowing some proven strategies from the electronics world rather than trying to evolve traditional automot... » read more

Functional Safety Implementation Goes Mainstream


Electronics engineers are being thrust into the automotive market like never before. The move to electrify automobiles, along with the advent of self-driving cars, means that silicon designers will be designing ever more sophisticated automotive ICs. But cars aren’t like most other electronic systems; it’s imperative that they cause no harm should they fail. This brings us to the realm o... » read more

Who’s Watching The Supply Chain?


Every company developing chips at the most advanced process nodes these days is using different architectures and heterogeneous processing and memory elements. There simply is no other way to get the kind of power/performance improvements needed to justify the expense of moving to a new process node. So while they will reap the benefits of traditional scaling, that alone is no longer enough. ... » read more

Shrinking AV’s 1 Billion Test Miles


There is still no answer to how many miles an autonomous vehicle needs to drive before it's proven safe. But some AV developers and test companies are hoping to ease the burden a bit with automation that makes millions of real and simulated miles of road testing simpler to implement, supported by standards that make it easier to create and trade simulation scenarios. The goal is to reduce th... » read more

← Older posts