Power/Performance Bits: June 23


Capturing waste heat Researchers at Wuhan University and University of California Los Angeles developed a hydrogel that can both cool down electronics and convert the waste heat into electricity. The thermogalvanic hydrogel consists of a polyacrylamide framework infused with water and specific ions. When they heated the hydrogel, two of the ions (ferricyanide and ferrocyanide) transferred e... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 16


One-directional optical Researchers from University of Pennsylvania, Peking University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology developed a design for optical devices that radiate light in only one direction, which could reduce energy consumption in optical fiber networks and data centers. Light tends to flow in a single direction optical fibers, but while most of the light passing through... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 26


Warmer quantum computing Researchers at the University of New South Wales Sydney, Université de Sherbrooke, Aalto University, and Keio University developed a proof-of-concept quantum processor unit cell on a silicon chip that works at 1.5 Kelvin – 15 times warmer than current chip-based technology that uses superconducting qubits. "This is still very cold, but is a temperature that can b... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 21


Memristors reappear The University of Massachusetts Amherst has taken a step towards of the realization of neuromorphic computing--it has devised bio-voltage memristors based on protein nanowires. In neuromorphic computing, the idea is to bring the memory closer to the processing tasks to speed up a system. For this, the industry is attempting to replicate the brain in silicon. The goal is ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 24


Autonomous microscopes FLEET, also known as the ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies, has developed an autonomous scanning probe microscopy (SPM) technology. SPM is an instrument that makes use of an atomically sharp probe. The probe is placed in close proximity above the surface of a sample. With the probe, the SPM forms images of the surface of the sample... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 15


When self-driving cars collide As self-driving car technology develops and evolves, it is inevitable that there will be collisions while the tech matures. “What can we do in order to minimize the consequences?” asks Amir Khajepour, a professor of mechanical and mechatronics engineering at the University of Waterloo. “That is our focus.” The first rule for the autonomous vehicle (... » read more

Week in Review – IoT, Security, Autos


Products/Services Arm TechCon got under way with a series of announcements. Arm is a founding member of the Autonomous Vehicle Computing Consortium, along with General Motors, Toyota Motor, DENSO, Continental, Bosch, NXP Semiconductors, and Nvidia. More information on the consortium is available here. “Imagine a world where vehicles are able to perceive their dynamically changing environment... » read more

Week in Review – IoT, Security, Autos


Products/Services Rambus entered an exclusive agreement to acquire the Silicon IP, Secure Protocols, and Provisioning business from Verimatrix, formerly known as Inside Secure. Financial terms were not revealed. The transaction is expected to close this year. Rambus will use the Verimatrix offerings in such demanding applications as artificial intelligence, automotive, the Internet of Things, ... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 3


Microprocessor built with carbon nanotubes Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were able to design a microprocessor with carbon nanotubes and fabricate the chip with traditional processes, an advance that could be used in next-generation computers. Work on producing carbon nanotube field-effect transistors has gone on for some time. Fabricated at scale, those CNFETs oft... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Autos


Products/Services Huawei Technologies is again delaying the public introduction of its Mate X foldable smartphone. It is unlikely the product will be marketed in the U.S., given the ongoing trade war. The official rollout now seems likely to come in November, in time for the holiday shopping season. Samsung Electronics has had its problems with foldable phones, yet those were due to manufactur... » read more

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