The Week in Review: IoT


Tools/Chips Synopsys rolled out a new release of its automotive exterior lighting design and analysis software. The tool calculations and generates images for multiple viewing directions and different lighting conditions. Lighting on vehicles has become far more complex than just shining a beam on the road. The latest technology can adapt to road conditions, other cars, and help illuminate the... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Finance CyberInt raised $18 million in new funding led by Viola Growth and including existing investors. The company provides cybersecurity detection and response services. CyberInt has offices in Israel, the U.S., the United Kingdom, Singapore, and Panama. San Diego-based Kneron, which provides artificial intelligence technology for edge devices, received $18 million in Series A1 funding l... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Finance Orbbec of Shenzhen, China, a developer of motion sensing technology, raised more than $200 million in Series D funding led by Ant Financial. Also participating in the new round were SAIF Financial, Green Pine Capital Partners, R-Z Capital, and Tianlangxing Capital Partners. Established in 2013, Orbbec develops 3D sensors for applications in facial recognition, gesture recognition, robo... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Conferences Internet of Things World 2018 takes place next week at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Silicon Valley. Executives of GE Digital, The Chamberlain Group, and UPS will be among those giving keynote addresses during the four-day conference. Monday will see pre-conference workshops, followed by three days of keynotes, presentations, and an expo floor taking in 100,000 square feet o... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Cybersecurity Arm this week introduced the Cortex-M35P processor with anti-tampering technology and software isolation. The company also debuted security intellectual property to protect Internet of Things devices from physical cyberattacks and close proximity side-channel attacks. Paul Williamson, Arm’s vice president and general manager of the IoT Device IP line of business, provides more ... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Cybersecurity Cybersecurity concerns continued to generate news this week. Symantec reported a corporate espionage hacking campaign against manufacturers of medical supplies, dubbing the efforts “Orangeworm.” The hackers have attacked 24 or more targets this year, and almost 100 since 2015, according to the security software and services firm. Meanwhile, the House Energy and Commerce Co... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Cybersecurity The U.S. and U.K. governments collaborated on an unprecedented message on Monday, together warning that Russian cyberattacks may extend beyond government and private organizations to individual homes and offices. The attacks may focus on Internet of Things devices, said Rob Joyce, the cybersecurity coordinator for the National Security Council, who soon after resigned from the Wh... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Finance Palo Alto, Calif.-based Armis raised $30 million in Series B funding, bringing total funding for the provider of enterprise Internet of Things security to $47 million. Red Dot Capital Partners of Israel led the round, joined by Bain Capital Ventures. Existing investors Sequoia Capital and Tenaya Capital also participated in the latest funding, which Armis will use to expand sales and m... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Investment Microsoft this week said it will spend $5 billion over four years on Internet of Things programs in research, development, and partner enablement. The company previously spent $1.5 billion on developing IoT technology. The move could pay dividends for the Microsoft Azure cloud platform and lead to wider use of Azure Stack, which pairs Microsoft software with hardware from approved p... » read more

The Week in Review: IoT


Regulation The Consumer Product Safety Commission is accepting public comments on “potential safety issues and hazards associated with Internet-connected consumer products.” The agency is concerned about “unexpected operating conditions” with Internet of Things devices, along with hacking that could start fires through a stovetop or grill, and the potential compromising of home safety ... » read more

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