March 2017


The Week In Review: Manufacturing


Chipmakers At an event, Intel’s Technology and Manufacturing group outlined the company's vision. As part of the event, Intel reiterated what many are saying—the current node designations are meaningless and misleading. “For example, Intel estimates that its 14nm solution that has been out in the market since 2014 should be equal to 10nm solutions released by competitors in the near futu... » read more

The Week In Review: IoT


Products NXP Semiconductors this week brought out several Internet of Things devices and other products for using near-field communications in advanced product authentication, integrity assurance, and enhanced user engagement in consumer manufactured goods, health care, retail, and other industries. The company has introduced the NTAG 413 DNA and NTAG 213 Tag Tamper devices to combat fake prod... » read more

The Week In Review: Design


M&A Siemens closed the acquisition of Mentor Graphics, making Mentor now part of Siemens' product lifecycle management (PLM) software business. The $4.5 billion deal, announced last November, brings Siemens into the IC design tool and embedded software markets and expands Siemens' multi-physics and electronic simulation capabilities in the growing digital twin space, which ties together ... » read more

HBM Upstages DDR In Bandwidth, Power


For graphics, networking, and high performance computing, the latest iteration of high-bandwidth memory (HBM) continues to rise up as a viable contender against conventional DDR, GDDR designs, and other advanced memory architectures such as the Hybrid Memory Cube. [getkc id="276" kc_name="HBM"] enables lower power consumption per I/O and higher bandwidth memory access with a more condensed f... » read more

IoT Security Risks Grow


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss security issues with Asaf Shen, vice president of marketing for security IP in [getentity id="22186" e_name="ARM's"] Systems & Software Group; Timothy Dry, principal staff marketing manager for the Industrial IoT segment at [getentity id="22819" comment="GlobalFoundries"]; Chowdary Yanamadala, senior vice president of business development at Cha... » read more

Learn From The Experts


I visited SNUG Silicon Valley last week. This annual Synopsys User Group event at the Santa Clara Convention Center is always a good way to get in touch with the end users of various EDA products. I attended the technical track with experts from ARM, NVIDIA, Intel and Synopsys, who talked about their experience in accelerating software development, hardware verification and system validation... » read more

Custom Chip Verification Issues Grow


With the transition to finFETs, design conditions have grown more intense. They now include a wider PVT range and less headroom. As a result, electronic systems for applications such as mobile, consumer, and automotive increasingly are becoming more difficult to design due to the exacting performance requirements of these applications. This is particularly evident in custom design, including... » read more

Blog Review: March 29


In a video, Cadence's Megha Daga introduces how convolutional neural networks identify objects and the wide range of applications for the technology. Mentor's Ron Press proposes a way to take advantage of hierarchical DFT features, even if a design wasn't designed for it. Synopsys' Robert Vamosi shares highlights of the RAND Corporation's extensive report examining zero day vulnerabilitie... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 28


Dental implants Borrowing some of the same processes used in the semiconductor industry, the Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry and the University of Plymouth have developed new nanocoating materials for dental implants. Some three million Americans have dental implants, according to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry (AAID). This number is rising by 500,000 a year, accordin... » read more

System Bits: March 28


Automating biology experiments with adapted Lego kit To bring more of the features of modern biology labs — that often use robotic assemblies to drop precise amounts of fluids into experimental containers — to students and teachers, Stanford University researchers have shown how an off-the-shelf Lego kit can be modified to create inexpensive automated systems to do this in clubs or classro... » read more

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