Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 23


Graphene energy Researchers from the University of Arkansas, University of Pennsylvania, and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid built a circuit capable of capturing graphene's thermal motion and converting it into an electrical current. "An energy-harvesting circuit based on graphene could be incorporated into a chip to provide clean, limitless, low-voltage power for small devices or sensors,... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 17


NVMe controller for research Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) developed a non-volatile memory express (NVMe) controller for storage devices and made it freely available to universities and research institutions in a bid to reduce research costs. Poor accessibility of NVMe controller IP is hampering academic and industrial research, the team argue... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 9


Integrated transistor cooling Researchers at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) created a single chip that combines a transistor and microfluidic cooling system for more efficient transistor heat management. The team focused on a co-design approach for the electrical and mechanical aspects of the chip, bringing the electronics and cooling design together and aiming to extract... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 3


Wirelessly charging multiple devices Researchers from ITMO University developed a metamaterial that can be used to turn surfaces into wireless charging areas for multiple devices from different manufacturers with different power transfer standards. "There are various wireless power transfer standards with different frequencies, so you can't just use a charger by any manufacturer," said Poli... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 27


Room-temp superconductivity Researchers at the University of Rochester, University of Nevada Las Vegas, and Intel created a material with superconducting properties at room temperature, the first time this has been observed. The researchers combined hydrogen with carbon and sulfur to photochemically synthesize simple organic-derived carbonaceous sulfur hydride in a diamond anvil cell, which... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 20


Benchmarking quantum layout synthesis Computer scientists at the University of California Los Angeles found that current compilers for quantum computers are inhibiting optimal performance and argue that better quantum compilation design could help improve computation speeds up to 45 times. The team designed a family of benchmark quantum circuits with known optimal depths or sizes, which cou... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 12


More stable quantum states Researchers at the University of Chicago found a way to make quantum systems retain coherency 10,000 times longer. The fragile nature of quantum states remains a challenge for developing practical applications of quantum computing, as they can be easily disrupted by background noise coming from vibrations, temperature changes or stray electromagnetic fields. Ap... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 6


Waste plastic supercapacitor Researchers from the University of California Riverside found a way to recycle waste plastic into energy storage devices. The work focused on polyethylene terephthalate plastic waste, or PET, which is found in soda bottles and many other consumer products. The researchers first dissolved pieces of PET plastic bottles in a solvent. Using electrospinning, they fab... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 29


Implantable transmitter Researchers from Purdue University developed a fully implantable, wirelessly powered 2.4GHz radio-frequency transmitter chip for wireless sensor nodes and biomedical devices. The team says the transmitter chip consumes the lowest amount of energy per digital bit published to date, consuming an active-mode power of 70 μW at 10 Mbps while radiating -33 dBm of power, r... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 22


Drawing sensors on skin Researchers from the University of Houston and University of Chicago created an ink pen that can draw multifunctional sensors and circuits directly on skin. These "drawn-on-skin electronics" aim to provide more precise health data, free of the artifacts that are associated with wearable devices and flexible electronic patches. Caused when the sensor doesn't move prec... » read more

← Older posts