Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 15


Higher-res lidar Researchers from Purdue University and École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) devised a way to improve lidar and provide higher-resolution detection of nearby fast-moving objects through mechanical control and modulation of light on a silicon chip. "Frequency modulated continuous wave" (FMCW) lidar detects objects by scanning laser light from the top of a vehicl... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 9


Smaller, cheaper integrated photonics Researchers from the University of California Santa Barbara, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) developed a way to integrate an optical frequency comb on a silicon photonic chip. Optical frequency combs are collections of equally spaced frequencies of laser light (so called because when pl... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 1


Cooling sensors with lasers Researchers at the University of Washington developed a way to cool a solid semiconductor sensor component with an infrared laser. The laser was able to cool the solid semiconductor by at least 20 degrees C, or 36 F, below room temperature. The device uses a cantilever, similar to a diving board, that can oscillate in response to thermal energy at room temperatur... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 25


AI architecture optimization Researchers at Rice University, Stanford University, University of California Santa Barbara, and Texas A&M University proposed two complementary methods for optimizing data-centric processing. The first, called TIMELY, is an architecture developed for “processing-in-memory” (PIM). A promising PIM platform is resistive random access memory, or ReRAM. Whil... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 18


Flexible, hole-filled films Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) and Hongik University propose a simple way to make flexible electrodes and thin film transistors last longer: adding lots of tiny holes. A major problem with flexible electronics is the formation of microscopic cracks after repeated bending which can cause the device to lose its conducti... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 10


Flexible electrodes for thin films Researchers from the University of Queensland and ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science (University of Melbourne) developed a material for flexible, recyclable, transparent electrodes that could be used in things like solar panels, touchscreens, and smart windows. Eser Akinoglu of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science said, "The performance... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 4


Assessing code similarity Researchers from Intel, MIT, and Georgia Institute of Technology created an automated engine designed to learn what a piece of software intends to do by studying the structure of the code and analyzing syntactic differences of other code with similar behavior. The machine inferred code similarity (MISIM) program, a subset of Intel's work on machine programming, was... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 28


Programmable photonics Researchers from the University of Southampton developed a method for making programmable  integrated switching units on a silicon photonics chip. By using a generic optical circuit that can be fabricated in bulk then later programmed for specific applications, the team hopes to reduce production costs. "Silicon photonics is capable of integrating optical devices and... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 21


AI hardware Researchers at Purdue University, University of California San Diego, Argonne National Laboratory, University of Louisville, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and University of Iowa developed hardware that can learn skills, offloading some of the energy needed by AI software. "Software is taking on most of the challenges in AI. If you could incorporate intelligence into the circui... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 14


5G switches Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and University of Lille built a new radio frequency switch that could save power in 5G devices when not actively jumping between different networks and spectrum frequencies. “It has become clear that the existing switches consume significant amounts of power, and that power consumed is useless power,” said Deji Akinwande, a ... » read more

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