Auto Chip Test Getting Harder


Chipmakers and test/validation companies are helping lead the effort to develop self-driving cars, but they are facing a wide range of technical and even cultural barriers. Advanced driver assist systems (ADAS) already are the most complex systems by far in modern cars, the best of which hover between Level 2 and Level 3 on the five-step autonomy ladder maintained by the Society of Automotiv... » read more

Auto Chip Ecosystem Needs Common Language


In order to reach the levels of robustness that autonomous vehicles will require, companies throughout the automotive and semiconductor ecosystem are working with an eye toward high-sigma design. But along with this robustness, there must be a clear understanding of the situation at hand, how semiconductors can improve the number of vehicle fatalities, and make sure everyone is communicating... » read more

Smart Cities’ Head Start On The Mobility Future


Even if autonomy is still mostly in the R&D, balky-science-project phase, vehicle connectivity is increasingly here today. And that’s good news since connected cars deliver a meaningful subset of the societal upside promised by their eventual fully autonomous future selves, especially when it comes to safety, traffic management and navigation. But beyond the dashboard, as the world become... » read more

How Vehicle Electrification Impacts Electrical System Design


Autonomy and electrification are demanding significant changes to electrical and electronic architectures within vehicles. This is due in part to the introduction of high voltages, increased safety considerations and significant weight reductions needed to maximize vehicle range from electrification, and ‘fail operational’ designs, hugely increased data network loading and virtual validatio... » read more

Moving To ASICs For ADAS


By some estimates, there are now more than 260 startups and established companies around the world scrambling to develop, qualify and bring to market chips and technologies for new ADAS (advanced driver-assistance systems) and autonomous driving applications. Accordingly, venture capitalists, technology companies, carmakers, Tier 1 automotive suppliers and others are sharply ratcheting up ... » read more

Testing Cars In Context


The choices for companies developing systems or components that will work in autonomous vehicles is to road test them for millions of miles or to simulate them, or some combination of both. Simulation is much quicker, and it has worked well in the semiconductor world for decades. Simulating a chip or electronic system in context is hard enough. But simulating a system of systems in the real... » read more

How To Test Autonomous Vehicles


By Kevin Fogarty and Ed Sperling The race is on to develop ways of testing autonomous vehicles to prove they are safe under most road conditions, but this has turned out to be much more difficult than initially thought. The autonomous vehicle technology itself is still in various stages of development, with carmakers struggling to fine-tune AI algorithms that can guide robots on wheels th... » read more

Getting To The Self-Driving Car


Realizing the vision of the fully autonomous vehicle is one of the most ambitious research and development initiatives since the Apollo program of the Space Age. While the goal of Apollo was to send a man to the Moon and safely return him to Earth, the goal of self-driving cars is to get a person out from behind the steering wheel and safely convey that person to home, work, a vacation resor... » read more

Self-Driving Hits The Safety Reset Button


All of a sudden the autonomous future is looking a bit more uncertain, which is somewhat surprising given what tech and auto boosters have been saying for years now — namely, that self-driving cars are “just around the corner.” (Google that phrase to see just how often they’ve been saying it. Even the starchy Economist trumpets this very meme.) The American Center for Mobility (ACM... » read more

Regulations Trail Autonomous Vehicles


Fragmented regulations and unrealistic expectations may be the biggest hurdles for chipmakers selling into the market for self-driving cars during the next few years. Carmakers and the semiconductor industry have made tremendous progress building real-time vision systems and artificial intelligence into relatively traditional automobiles during the past decade or so. But federal and state re... » read more

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