Power/Performance Bits: March 3


Optimizing fiber networks Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology are working towards reducing the energy consumption of fiber optic communications before the amount of electricity required by the Internet becomes too great to manage. To improve overall efficiency, the team tackled several aspects of fiber optic cables. One of the major energy drains the team identified was the err... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 10


Balancing battery capacity and stability Researchers at Rice University are working to develop batteries that are better geared toward electric cars and more robust off-grid energy storage by digging into why lithium gets trapped in batteries, thus limiting the number of times it can be charged and discharged at full power. The team found that by not maxing out a battery's storage capacity,... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 4


Infrared nanoantenna Researchers at the University of Würzburg built a nanoantenna capable of generating directed infrared light. The Yagi-Uda antenna is the smallest of its type yet created. "Basically, it works in the same way as its big brothers for radio waves ," said René Kullock, a member of the nano-optics team at Würzburg. An AC voltage is applied that causes electrons in the met... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 28


Accelerator-on-chip Researchers at Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory created an electron-accelerator-on-chip. While the technique is much less powerful than standard particle accelerators, it can be much smaller. It relied upon an infrared laser to deliver, in less than a hair’s width, the sort of energy boost that takes microwaves many feet. The team carved ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 21


Two-layer MRAM Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology propose a simpler MRAM construction that could perform faster with less power than conventional memories. The idea relies on unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance (USMR), a spin-related phenomenon that could be used to develop MRAM cells with an extremely simple structure. The spin Hall effect leads to the accumulation of elect... » read more

Replenishing The Grid With A SiC-Based Bi-Directional On-Board Charger


Range anxiety and charger availability have long been the main hurdles to the adoption of electric vehicles. But even as car makers have demonstrated their batteries can go longer distances and charging stations have proliferated, challenges with EV charging remain as well as opportunities to load balance power grids. The migration to electric vehicles also means looking at how they can bett... » read more

Week In Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things SiFive is bringing RISC-V to IoT makers and university developers through the RISC-V-based SiFive Learn Initiative, an open-source learning package that can be used to create a low-cost RISC-V hardware compatible with AWS IoT Core. The development platform SiFive Learn Inventor has a software package and education enablement course. It includes: The programmable SiFive Lear... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 19


Quantum communications chip Researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Australian National University, A∗STAR, University of Science and Technology of China, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Sun Yat-sen University, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, and National University of Singapore built an integrated silicon photonic chip capable of performing quantu... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Autos


Products/Services Rambus reports completing the sale of its Payments and Ticketing businesses to Visa for $75 million in cash. “With 30 years of experience pushing the envelope in semiconductor design, we look toward a future of continued innovation to carry on our mission of making data faster and safer,” Rambus President and CEO Luc Seraphin said in a statement. “Completing this transa... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 22


Flexible battery Researchers at ETH Zurich developed a flexible thin-film battery that can be bent, stretched, and twisted without interrupting the supply of power. Key to the battery is a new electrolyte and entirely flexible components. "To date, no one has employed exclusively flexible components as systematically as we have in creating a lithium-ion battery," said Markus Niederberger, P... » read more

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