Quantum Random Numbers Future-Proof Encryption


It may be a decade or more before quantum computers become common enough that we'll find out whether "post-quantum cryptography" will stand up to genuine quantum computers. In the meantime, some quantum researchers are peeling off specific functions and turning them into products or companies so that it's possible to take advantage of the potential of quantum computers without actually havin... » read more

Quantum Computing Becoming Real


Quantum computing will begin rolling out in increasingly useful ways over the next few years, setting the stage for what ultimately could lead to a shakeup in high-performance computing and eventually in the cloud. Quantum computing has long been viewed as some futuristic research project with possible commercial applications. It typically needs to run at temperatures close to absolute zero,... » read more

Blog Review: May 2


Arm's Greg Yeric looks towards the future of 3D ICs with a dive into transistor-level 3D, including the different proposed methods of stacking transistors, power/performance benefits, and challenges such as parasitic resistance. Mentor's Kurt Takara, Chris Kwok, Dominic Lucido, and Joe Hupcey III explain how a custom synchronizer methodology can help avoid CDC mistakes and errors in FPGA des... » read more

Built-In Security For Auto Chips


The road to autonomous vehicles depends upon components that are secured against hacking and other outside interference. The cybersecurity precautions necessary for self-driving cars must be embedded in chips and systems from the beginning of the supply chain. Automotive manufacturers and their Tier 1 suppliers are counting on their electronics vendors to provide products that can withst... » read more

Who’s Responsible For Security?


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss security issues and how to fix them with Mark Schaeffer, senior product marketing manager for secure solutions at Renesas Electronics; Haydn Povey, CTO of Secure Thingz; Marc Canel, vice president of security systems and technologies at [getentity id="22186" comment="Arm"]; Richard Hayton, CTO of Trustonic; Anders Holmberg, director of corporate dev... » read more

Who’s Responsible For Security?


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss security issues and how to fix them with Mark Schaeffer, senior product marketing manager for secure solutions at Renesas Electronics; Haydn Povey, CTO of Secure Thingz; Marc Canel, vice president of security systems and technologies at [getentity id="22186" comment="Arm"]; Richard Hayton, CTO of Trustonic; Anders Holmberg, director of corporate dev... » read more

Bypassing Encryption With Side-Channel Attacks


Devices and systems that implement robust encryption/decryption algorithms using cryptographic keys were historically considered secure. Nevertheless, there is a category of attacks that simply ignore the mathematic properties of a cryptographic system – and instead focuses on its physical implementation in hardware. This vector is known as side-channel attacks, which are commonly referred... » read more

Different Approaches To Security


Everyone acknowledges the necessity for cybersecurity precautions, yet the world continues to be challenged by an invisible, inventive army of hackers. The massive data breach at Equifax was only the latest in a series of successful cyberattacks on the credit monitoring firm. Lessons learned from the previous breaches apparently didn’t mitigate this year’s embarrassment for the company. ... » read more

The Week In Review: Design


IP Cryptographic flaws have been discovered in the IEEE P1735 standard for encrypting IP and managing access rights. A team from the University of Florida found "a surprising number of cryptographic mistakes in the standard. In the most egregious cases, these mistakes enable attack vectors that allow us to recover the entire underlying plaintext IP." The researchers warn that an adversary coul... » read more

Security: Losses Outpace Gains


Paul Kocher, chief scientist in [getentity id="22671" e_name="Rambus'"] Cryptography Research Division, sat down with Semiconductor Engineering to discuss the new threats to security, artificial intelligence and machine learning, and how to engineer a secure system. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. SE: Where are we with security? It seems that rather than getting better, thing... » read more

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