Resetting Serial Memory When A System Failure Occurs


Stability is an important consideration in embedded design, but electronic systems can suffer malfunctions triggered by a myriad of root causes. These include poor signal integrity, power spikes, software errors, and erroneous user interaction, just to name a few. These anomalies, in turn, can lead to inconsistent system operation or can even cause the system to hang. Although the list of po... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 14


Detecting malware with power monitoring Engineers at the University of Texas at Austin and North Carolina State University devised a way to detect malware in large-scale embedded computer systems by monitoring power usage and identifying unusual surges as a warning of potential infection. The method relies on an external piece of hardware that can be plugged into the system to observe and m... » read more

Getting A Complete Picture Of Automotive Software


The automotive industry is currently undergoing a major disruption, usually referred as the shift to automated, connected, electric, and shared vehicles (ACES[1]). Naturally, these changes also have a significant impact on the requirements of the hard- and software architectures of these new vehicles: Service-oriented software architectures used by multiple applications running on generali... » read more

RISC-V At Embedded World


As we arrive back from a busy, and unusually warm, Embedded World 2019 and recall the many interesting discussions we had over the three-day show, one thing is most certainly clear: This is the Mobile World Congress (MWC) event for Nuremberg. Its many halls were jam-packed with technology from a wide variety of sectors but also with an array of application focal points. There was everything ... » read more

Inaccurate Assumptions Mean Software Issues


It doesn’t seem that long ago when features and functionality were being added to next generation processors and SoCs ahead of demand. Actually, I recall when new processors were released, embedded software developers were forced to think of innovative ways to exploit the new features in order to differentiate the product to not be left behind. Today, in many respects it seems as if the... » read more

Fundamental Shifts In 2018


What surprised the industry in 2018?  While business has been strong, markets are changing, product categories are shifting and clouds are forming on the horizon. As 2018 comes to a close, most companies are pretty happy with the way everything turned out. Business has been booming, new product categories developing, and profits are meeting or beating market expectations. "2018 was indeed a... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things Forrester Research released its 2019 Internet of Things predictions. Some key points: Bundled service offerings will catalyze a sleepy consumer IoT market; cybercriminals will lay siege to a smart-city implementation; and a market for IoT managed services will emerge in 2019. Black Friday and Cyber Monday are coming up. Those days present some opportunities to purchase ... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things Arm aims to accelerate Linux-based embedded design through providing quick access to the Cortex-A5 CPU under the Arm DesignStart program. Developers can work on embedded and Internet of Things system-on-a-chip devices for gateways, medical systems, smart homes, and wearable electronics. IP access to the Cortex-A5 is now $75,000, with one-year of design support from Arm exper... » read more

Week In Review: Design, Low Power


Cadence teamed up with nine PCB manufacturing partners on an ecosystem to provide easier access to partners' technology files to improve PCB manufacturability. The program, DesignTrue DFM, allows for automated import of a manufacturer's latest DFM rules as well as rule checking in real time as part of the PCB layout process. The nine initial PCB manufactures supporting the program are: Bay Area... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things Silicon Labs worked with Norway’s Q-Free to create the ParQSense Smart Parking Sensor, which helps drivers find available outdoor parking spaces. ParQSense uses the chip company’s Wonder Gecko wireless microcontroller for connectivity and control. Having gone through pilot testing in the European Union and North America this year, ParQSense is being released for commerci... » read more

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