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Making AI Run Faster


The semiconductor industry has woken up to the fact that heterogeneous computing is the way forward and that inferencing will require more than a GPU or a CPU. The numbers being bandied about by the 30 or so companies working on this problem are 100X improvements in performance. But how to get there isn't so simple. It requires four major changes, as well as some other architectural shifts. ... » read more

Using ASICs For AI Inferencing


Flex Logix’s Cheng Wang looks at why ASICs are the best way to improve performance and optimize power and area for inferencing, and how to add flexibility into those designs to deal with constantly changing algorithms and data sets. https://youtu.be/XMHr7sz9JWQ » read more

The Next Big Chip Companies


Rambus’ Mike Noonen looks at why putting everything on a single die no longer works, what comes after Moore’s Law, and what the new business model looks like for chipmakers. https://youtu.be/X6Kca8Vm-wA » read more

Intel’s Next Move


Gadi Singer, vice president and general manager of Intel's Artificial Intelligence Products Group, sat down with Semiconductor Engineering to talk about Intel's vision for deep learning and why the company is looking well beyond the x86 architecture and one-chip solutions. SE: What's changing on the processor side? Singer: The biggest change is the addition of deep learning and neural ne... » read more

Scalable, Cloud-Ready IC Validator Solution For Advanced DRC Nodes


As we move to a data-centric world, semiconductor companies across the globe are working at a furious pace to develop and manufacture Artificial Intelligent [AI] chips. AI is all about an algorithm that mimics a human’s ability to learn and decide. For example, AI can be used to interpret and understand an image that helps a doctor make a better diagnosis for a patient. This requires chips to... » read more

Architecting For AI


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to talk about what is needed today to enable artificial intelligence training and inferencing with Manoj Roge, vice president, strategic planning at Achronix; Ty Garibay, CTO at Arteris IP; Chris Rowen, CEO of Babblelabs; David White, distinguished engineer at Cadence; Cheng Wang, senior VP engineering at Flex Logix; and Raik Brinkmann, president and CEO of O... » read more

Machine Learning’s Limits


Semiconductor Engineering sat down with Rob Aitken, an Arm fellow; Raik Brinkmann, CEO of OneSpin Solutions; Patrick Soheili, vice president of business and corporate development at eSilicon; and Chris Rowen, CEO of Babblelabs. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. To view part one, click here. SE: How much of what goes wrong in machine learning depends on the algorithm being wrong... » read more

IBM Takes AI In Different Directions


Jeff Welser, vice president and lab director at IBM Research Almaden, sat down with Semiconductor Engineering to discuss what's changing in artificial intelligence and what challenges still remain. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. SE: What's changing in AI and why? Welser: The most interesting thing in AI right now is that we've moved from narrow AI, where we've proven you... » read more

Where The Rubber Hits The Road: Implementing Machine Learning On Silicon


Machine learning (ML) is everywhere these days. The common thread between advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) vision applications in our cars and the voice (and now facial) recognition applications in our phones is that ML algorithms are doing the heavy lifting, or more accurately, the inferencing. In fact, neural networks (NN) can even be used in application spaces such as file compressi... » read more

When AI Goes Awry


The race is on to develop intelligent systems that can drive cars, diagnose and treat complex medical conditions, and even train other machines. The problem is that no one is quite sure how to diagnose latent or less-obvious flaws in these systems—or better yet, to prevent them from occurring in the first place. While machines can do some things very well, it's still up to humans to devise... » read more

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