Week in Review – IoT, Security, Autos


Products/Services Achronix Semiconductor joined Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing’s IP Alliance Program, part of the foundry’s Open Innovation Platform. Achronix’s Speedcore eFPGA IP is available today on TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) and N7 process technologies, and it will be soon available on TSMC 12nm FinFET Compact Technology (12FFC). Cadence Design Systems announced that its di... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 24


Free flow electricity Researchers have made some new breakthroughs in the emerging field of Weyl fermions and semi-metals, a move that could one day enable free flow electricity in systems. In 2015, Princeton University and others finally proved a massless particle that had been theorized for 85 years--the Weyl fermion. A fermion is a subatomic particle. Proposed by the mathematician and... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 27


A ring of 18 carbon atoms Scientists at IBM Research – Zurich and Oxford University write about allotropes of carbon – the many versions of atomic carbon formations, such as diamonds and graphite. “Carbon, one of the most abundant elements in the universe, can exist in different forms - called allotropes - giving it completely different properties from color to shape to hardness. For... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things IBM this week launched the Watson Decision Platform for Agriculture, which combines artificial intelligence, Internet of Things technology, and cloud-based offerings, providing insights to farmers through a managed service. Among other features, growers can deploy drones to send photos to the IBM Cloud for AI-based trend analysis and detection of crop diseases. The platform ... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things Arm uncorked its first forward-looking CPU roadmap and performance numbers for client computing. The company said it expects to deliver annual performance improvements of more than 15% per year through 2020. The targeted market includes 5G, always-on, always-connected devices. C3 IoT will work with Google Cloud to support artificial intelligence and Internet of Things dep... » read more

System Bits: March 6


Printed graphene biosensors According to researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT in St. Ingbert (in Germany’s Saarland region), cell-based biosensors can simulate the effect of various substances, such as drugs, on the human body in the laboratory but depending on the measuring principle, producing them can be expensive. As such, they aren’t used very often.... » read more

Systems Bits: Feb. 27


Prepare to prevent malicious AI use According to the University of Cambridge, 26 experts on the security implications of emerging technologies have jointly authored a ground-breaking report thereby sounding the alarm about the potential malicious use of artificial intelligence (AI) by rogue states, criminals, and terrorists. The report forecasts rapid growth in cyber-crime and the misuse of... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 3


Polariton graphs In a development that a team of researchers from the UK and Russia say could eventually surpass the capabilities of even the most powerful supercomputers, a type of ‘magic dust’ — which combines light and matter — can be used to solve complex problems. Hailing from the University of Cambridge, University of Southampton and Cardiff University in the UK and the Skolk... » read more

System Bits: Feb. 14


Potential anticancer drugs selected by neural network Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology researchers along with Mail.Ru Group, and Insilico Medicine have applied a generative neural network to create new pharmaceutical medicines with certain desired characteristics. A generative adversarial network (GAN) was developed and trained to "invent" new molecular structures in order to dram... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 11


Carbon Is So 2015 Researchers at MIT have created a supercapacitor that relies on a material other than carbon. This new class of materials, called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), are a porous and sponge-like, according to MIT, tthereby providing a much larger surface area than carbon. As with most things electrical, more surface area is essential for superconductors. The problem the re... » read more

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