Emulation-Driven Implementation


Tech Talk: Haroon Chaudhri, director of Prime Power at Synopsys, talks about how to shorten time to market and increase confidence in advanced-node designs, while also reducing the amount of guard-banding and improving design freedom. https://youtu.be/xT3CIqjnaBk » read more

System-Level Power Modeling Takes Root


Power, heat, and their combined effects on aging and reliability, are becoming increasingly critical variables in the design of chips that will be used across a variety of new and existing markets. As more processing moves to edge, where sensors are generating a tsunami of data, there are a number of factors that need to be considered in designs. On one side, power budgets need to reflect th... » read more

Improving Security In Cars


When security researchers first demonstrated that they could hack a car over the internet to control its brakes and transmission, Chrysler had to recall 1.4 million vehicles to fix the software vulnerability. The infamous Jeep hack of 2015 was an expensive wake-up call for the automotive industry. So, what has changed since then? In today’s cars, software now controls everything from safet... » read more

Enabling Automotive Design


Falling automotive electronics prices, propelled by advances in chip manufacturing and innovations on the design side, are driving a whole new level of demand across the automotive industry. Innovations that were introduced at the luxury end of the car market over the past couple years already are being implemented in more standard vehicles. The single biggest driver of change in the automo... » read more

When Will It Be Done?


Design teams have done remarkably well in getting chips out the door on time, despite growing complexity at each new node and an increase in the number of features and IP blocks that need to be integrated into designs. There has been plenty of grumbling, along with dire warnings about the future of Moore's Law and the impact of industry consolidation. The reality, though, is that the volume ... » read more

Meeting ISO 26262 Guidelines


The average car today contains up to 100 million lines of code. Software controls everything from safety critical systems like brakes and power steering, to basic vehicle controls like doors and windows. Yet the average car today may have up to 150,000 bugs, many of which could damage the brand, hurt customer satisfaction and, in the most extreme case, lead to a catastrophic failure. Software d... » read more