Power/Performance Bits: Dec. 3


Waking up IoT devices Researchers at UC San Diego developed an ultra-low power wake-up receiver chip that aims to reduce the power consumption of sensors, wearables, and Internet of Things devices that only need to communicate information periodically. "The problem now is that these devices do not know exactly when to synchronize with the network, so they periodically wake up to do this eve... » read more

Addressing Pain Points In Chip Design


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss the impact of multi-physics and new market applications on chip design with John Lee, general manager and vice president of ANSYS' Semiconductor Business Unit; Simon Burke, distinguished engineer at Xilinx, Duane Boning, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT; and Thomas Harms, director EDA/IP Alliance at Infineon. What foll... » read more

Blog Review: Oct. 16


Arm's Greg Yeric dives into the challenges facing the semiconductor industry and potential solutions that could possibly have huge impacts toward the year 2030, from DNA self-assembly to new physics, in an adaptation of his wide-ranging Arm TechCon keynote. Cadence's Paul McLellan considers Google's recent quantum computing achievement, what quantum supremacy really means, and where it leave... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 3


Microprocessor built with carbon nanotubes Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were able to design a microprocessor with carbon nanotubes and fabricate the chip with traditional processes, an advance that could be used in next-generation computers. Work on producing carbon nanotube field-effect transistors has gone on for some time. Fabricated at scale, those CNFETs oft... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 15


Liquefied gas electrolyte Researchers at UC San Diego, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, and South 8 Technologies developed an electrolyte that could enable the replacement of the graphite anode in lithium-ion batteries with lithium-metal. Such a change would increase energy density 50% at the cell level, making for lighter batteries with more capacity. However, lithium-metal anodes are not compa... » read more

5G Heats Up Base Stations


Before 5G can be deployed commercially on a large scale, engineers have to solve some stubborn problems—including how to make a hot technology a whole lot cooler. 5G-capable modem chipsets are already on the market from Qualcomm, Samsung, Huawei, MediaTek, Intel and Apple, with some 5G service (LTE-Advanced/LTE-Advanced Pro) available in the U.S. But still mostly missing from the 5G equati... » read more

Machine Learning Based Prediction: Health Behavior on BP


Source: UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, Po-Han Chiang and Sujit Dey, Mobile Systems Design Lab, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Using wearable off-the-shelf technology and machine learning, UC San Diego researchers have developed a method to predict an individual’s blood pressure and provide personalized recommendations to lower it based on this data. The resea... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 9


Sensing with light pulses In a development expected to be useful in applications including distance measurement, molecular fingerprinting and ultrafast sampling, EPFL researchers have found a way to implement an optical sensing system by using spatial multiplexing, a technique originally developed in optical-fiber communication, which produces three independent streams of ultrashort optical pu... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 28


Multilayer stretchable electronics Researchers at UC San Diego, the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, and the Air Force Research Laboratory developed an approach to creating stacked, stretchable electronics with complex functionality. "Rigid electronics can offer a lot of functionality on a small footprint--they can easily be manufactured with as many as 50 layers of... » read more

Making Organic Semiconductors Plastic


Plastic. The very word implies deformability, the ability to bend and flex without damage in response to stress. In applications from biomedical sensors to solar cells, the potential advantages of organic semiconductors depend almost entirely on their deformability—are they flexible enough for inexpensive roll-to-roll processing? Able to tolerate flexion in use? Able to do without the bulky a... » read more

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